According to Sam Zell (Equity Residential, New York, NY) in a recent interview with CNBC, our emerging homeowners are creating a “reurbanization of America.” http://www.cnbc.com/id/101095397  Zell's statement echoes what our local expert Larry LaGrece has said, as well as the study reports coming out of the National Association of Realtors: outside of a focus on good schools for children, the next generation wants to go urban. Is this coming to a community near you? I decided to ask, and here are the results:

 

Grant Watkins-Davis -Missouri S&T, 18

"I want to eventually live in Colorado in a decently sized house.  I think urban development is important but needs to be carefully planned out to make sure it stays affordable and that space is used efficiently."

 

Lane Collins- Park University, 19

"I guess I’d choose a very popular city, or the middle of nowhere.  Two totally different things I know.  But I could see myself being happy in both.  I want to have a comfortable house.  One not super big and not cramped.  And urban development…the opportunities and potential it brings is good."

 

Kris Shivers- Missouri State University, 18

"1-When I start my career I want to live downtown but around age 30 I want to move to a more rural area where I can have some land. 2- Urban development I think is a good idea because it’s better to work on something that needs improvement than to let it get run down."

 

Tyler Arndt-  University of Missouri-Kansas City, 19

"Colorado, a contemporary home blended with traditional flare (designed by yours truly) and I think urban development is good to an extent!  I don’t want to eliminate the natural environment any more than it already is.  Deforestation is very real and it needs to be stopped but urban development should just be extended to other cities.  Rural areas should stay rural!  Limits should be set on each of course."

 

Kaitlyn Vann- Blue River Community College/University of Central Missouri, 20

"I actually still want to live in the Midwest in a medium sized home that’s cozy.  (As for) urban I hate that they damage a farmers crops and take away the beautiful land for pointless shopping centers.  I would understand more if it was a building that was in serious need.  Not just a shopping center. "

 

Kimberlie Powell – Blue River Community College, 18

"I want to be living in a small town like Wellington or even a place like Sibley.  I really would like a farmhouse.  I am against urban development.  I believe that we should keep our woods, forests, swamps and all that so we aren’t taking away the homes of wild life.   Over time they’re trying to develop the country side and they shouldn’t.  I personally don’t like the city.  I don’t want a neighbor with a house two steps away from mine.  I want space, freedom, and privacy away from other people which is something urban development takes away."

 

Porsche Schlapper- University of Central Missouri, 22

"Housing choices of generations is an interesting way to gauge the climate of the world that generation is living through, and the burbs were definitely indicative of an era dealing with a lot of things they hadn't had to deal with before the advent of so many new technologies and trends that either hadn't been around or hadn't really been full swing before the war. In terms of my thoughts on the housing market I'll be entering soon, I am a college senior graduating from University of Central Missouri in May 2014, and I anticipate moving to Wisconsin for graduate school after that, but I haven't made a final decision, however, I will be staying in the mid-US housing market for school. My history with housing thus far is apartments in a medium sized town isolated from urban areas. Because of the nature of what I want to do after I graduate, I plan to live in or near an urban area. Ideally it would be a smaller city outside of a larger one, and one that has its own history and culture and things to do and isn't just a suburb, sort of the way Independence is to Kansas City. I want the option to go urban but still the feel of a local community, which probably comes from being from a small town. I don't really have any desire to live in a pre-fab module in a brand new community you see popping up all over Missouri lately."

 

Rachel Young-Liberty High School, 17

"I think when I get out of college I'd like to live in a big city. Although, as far as raising a family goes (which will be very very far in the future), I think the suburbs are where I'll be."

 

Audrey L. Elder

Keller Williams

According to Sam Zell (Equity Residential, New York, NY) in a recent interview with CNBC, our emerging homeowners are creating a “reurbanization of America.” http://www.cnbc.com/id/101095397  Zell's statement echoes what our local expert Larry LaGrece has said, as well as the study reports coming out of the National Association of Realtors: outside of a focus on good schools for children, the next generation wants to go urban. Is this coming to a community near you? I decided to ask, and here are the results: Grant Watkins-Davis -Missouri S&T, 18 "I want to eventually live in Colorado in a decently sized house.  I think urban development is important but needs to be carefully planned out to make sure it stays affordable and that space is used efficiently." Lane Collins- Park University, 19 "I guess I’d choose a very popular city, or the middle of nowhere.  Two totally different things I know.  But I could see myself being happy in both.  I want to have a comfortable house.  One not super big and not cramped.  And urban development…the opportunities and potential it brings is good." Kris Shivers- Missouri State University, 18 "1-When I start my career I want to live downtown but around age 30 I want to move to a more rural area where I can have some land. 2- Urban development I think is a good idea because it’s better to work on something that needs improvement than to let it get run down." Tyler Arndt-  University of Missouri-Kansas City, 19 "Colorado, a contemporary home blended with traditional flare (designed by yours truly) and I think urban development is good to an extent!  I don’t want to eliminate the natural environment any more than it already is.  Deforestation is very real and it needs to be stopped but urban development should just be extended to other cities.  Rural areas should stay rural!  Limits should be set on each of course." Kaitlyn Vann- Blue River Community College/University of Central Missouri, 20 "I actually still want to live in the Midwest in a medium sized home that’s cozy.  (As for) urban I hate that they damage a farmers crops and take away the beautiful land for pointless shopping centers.  I would understand more if it was a building that was in serious need.  Not just a shopping center. " Kimberlie Powell – Blue River Community College, 18 "I want to be living in a small town like Wellington or even a place like Sibley.  I really would like a farmhouse.  I am against urban development.  I believe that we should keep our woods, forests, swamps and all that so we aren’t taking away the homes of wild life.   Over time they’re trying to develop the country side and they shouldn’t.  I personally don’t like the city.  I don’t want a neighbor with a house two steps away from mine.  I want space, freedom, and privacy away from other people which is something urban development takes away." Porsche Schlapper- University of Central Missouri, 22 "Housing choices of generations is an interesting way to gauge the climate of the world that generation is living through, and the burbs were definitely indicative of an era dealing with a lot of things they hadn't had to deal with before the advent of so many new technologies and trends that either hadn't been around or hadn't really been full swing before the war. In terms of my thoughts on the housing market I'll be entering soon, I am a college senior graduating from University of Central Missouri in May 2014, and I anticipate moving to Wisconsin for graduate school after that, but I haven't made a final decision, however, I will be staying in the mid-US housing market for school. My history with housing thus far is apartments in a medium sized town isolated from urban areas. Because of the nature of what I want to do after I graduate, I plan to live in or near an urban area. Ideally it would be a smaller city outside of a larger one, and one that has its own history and culture and things to do and isn't just a suburb, sort of the way Independence is to Kansas City. I want the option to go urban but still the feel of a local community, which probably comes from being from a small town. I don't really have any desire to live in a pre-fab module in a brand new community you see popping up all over Missouri lately." Rachel Young-Liberty High School, 17 "I think when I get out of college I'd like to live in a big city. Although, as far as raising a family goes (which will be very very far in the future), I think the suburbs are where I'll be." Audrey L. Elder Keller Williams