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Examiner
  • Last span takes the final plunge

  • More than 47 pounds of explosives dismantled the last stand of the old Hurricane Deck Bridge Thursday. The remaining 700-foot middle section of the steel truss superstructure came down just before 10 a.m. Jan. 30 in a bloom of smoke and a deep boom heard for miles away on the quiet winter morning.
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    • Blast numbers
      740 feet blasted in first round
      740 feet blasted in second round
      700 feet blasted in final round
      111.72 pounds of explosives for all three blasts
      31.16 pounds of exp...
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      Blast numbers
      740 feet blasted in first round

      740 feet blasted in second round

      700 feet blasted in final round

      111.72 pounds of explosives for all three blasts

      31.16 pounds of explosives in first blast

      33.44 pounds of explosives in second blast

      47.12 pounds of explosives in third blast

      3.26 million pounds of steel will be dropped into the lake during the three blasts

      1 million pounds of steel will drop into the lake from blasts one and two

      1.28 million pounds of steel will drop into the lake from the third blast

      38 - number of pieces the bridge will be sliced into by the three blasts

      23 feet - width of each of the 38 pieces the bridge

      28-59 feet - length of each of the 38 pieces

      2,180 feet of truss spans will be dropped in the blasting total

      2,280 feet - total length of the old bridge

      Source: Missouri Department of Transportation
  • More than 47 pounds of explosives dismantled the last stand of the old Hurricane Deck Bridge Thursday. The remaining 700-foot middle section of the steel truss superstructure came down just before 10 a.m. Jan. 30 in a bloom of smoke and a deep boom heard for miles away on the quiet winter morning.
    It was the last of three blasts utilized to demolish the historic bridge that carried decades of vehicles across the Lake of the Ozarks at the 35 mile marker after first opening as a toll bridge on Dec. 28, 1936.
    Prior to the old bridge, cars and people were moved across the water by ferry.
    The arched silhouette of the continuous cantilevered Warren deck-truss design won the Highway 5 bridge the award of Most Beautiful Steel Span built in 1936 from the American Institute of Steel Construction.
    Its giant puzzle of steel pieces towered over many boaters and swimmers as they made the Lake their playground through the changing eras.
    Its distinctive lines made the old bridge a landmark of the lake, especially after two similar bridges in the area were demolished and replaced several years ago.
    Area resident Kirk Peglow said seeing the old bridge go down brought back a lot of memories from his time visiting the lake from when his parents first got a house here in 1963.
    He and friends used to climb up onto the bridge and jump into the water from its arches. It also served as a marker for water skiing.
    Since moving to the lake full time last fall, he and wife Barb have enjoyed the bridge as part of the beautiful scene of the lake as seen from their condo at Summerplace.
    "It's a beautiful structure. They don't make them like that anymore," said Kirk.
    But however the old bridge looked, the eight-spans crossing was due for replacement as rust issues called for an overhaul and safer designs made the old bridge obsolete and structurally deficient.
    And with more winter weather ahead, Kirk and other lake area residents will likely be appreciating the wider design of the crossing sooner rather than later.
    After unexpected funding came through from savings on other area road projects, the Missouri Department of Transportation approved a $32.3 million contract with American Bridge Company, Inc. for the construction for a new bridge. The project got underway in 2012, continuing until its opening Sept. 10, 2013.
    Following the opening of the new wider and safer concrete Hurricane Deck Bridge, workers started the process of taking the old bridge down, removing the deck on top of the girders.
    Duane Houkom, Inc. was the subcontractor for the blasting, and the first implosion took place Dec. 7 and the second quickly following Dec. 21.
    Page 2 of 2 - But harsher winter weather in January has hampered crews working on the last leg of demolition as strong winds and icy temperatures necessitated more caution for workers who had to cut holes in the steel for the linear-shaped explosives that would sheer the old steel into pieces and send them into the water. The winter weather delayed the final blast from its originally scheduled time last weekend.
    Workers will now spend several weeks retrieving the steel by barge. The old steel pieces will be processed and salvaged as scrap metal.
    The very last bit of the project now is the old concrete piers that stick up out of the water where the superstructure once rested.
    The concrete of the piers will be cut or busted 30 feet down to allow for safe passage in the water.
    The completion of the project marks the end of roughly $100 million in bridge work by MoDOT in the region over the last 20 years.
    The new Hurricane Deck Bridge carries an average of 10,000 vehicles per day.
     
     
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