|
|
Examiner
Understanding Real Estate and Our Local Market
I Can't Answer That
email print
About this blog
By Audrey Elder
Audrey has been a small business owner for 17 years, and has worked as a Licensed Agent in the State of Missouri for over 8 years with a focus of helping buyers and sellers in the Eastern Jackson county area. Audrey's Real Estate distinctions ...
X
Real Estate
Audrey has been a small business owner for 17 years, and has worked as a Licensed Agent in the State of Missouri for over 8 years with a focus of helping buyers and sellers in the Eastern Jackson county area. Audrey's Real Estate distinctions include: 2012 KCRAR/WCR Real Estate Future Trail Blazer, Board Member KCRAR Govt. Affairs, and Missouri Association of Realtors; State Director.
Recent Posts
Aug. 25, 2014 10:40 a.m.
June 23, 2014 7:40 p.m.
May 16, 2014 1:50 p.m.
April 30, 2014 9:40 a.m.
April 7, 2014 1:55 p.m.
April 7, 2014 1:55 p.m.

Real Estate is an industry filled with questions.  In fact, if you aren’t asking questions, you’re potentially asking for trouble.



You may be surprised, however, to find out that a few commonly asked questions are handled much differently than you might think.



We’ll start with the “I can’t answer that list”:



“Why are the sellers moving?”  Unless a situation such as the home being an estate (which would already be disclosed) the seller’s motivation for moving can only be shared with a buyer or buyer’s agent when permission has been given to do so.  Basically the reason is not relevant to the sale of the home.  Some situations are emotional and some pressing.  Protecting a seller from having the sale of their home becoming a manipulation of their circumstances is the responsibility of the Realtor representing them.



Another common “can’t answer” question usually comes when I get a call on a home already under contract.  After I explain the seller has signed an offer and both parties are moving towards closing my caller will often ask “How much is the contract for?”  The answer is ALWAYS, “I can’t share that information with you until after the property has closed.  At that point the sales price becomes public information.”



If for some reason the contract didn’t close and the home came back on the market, it would be a major disadvantage to the seller for a potential buyer to know how much that original contract was for.  Most questions can be answered and should be asked, however if the privacy of either a seller or buyer is at risk the answer will always be, “I can’t answer that.”



Audrey L. Elder



Keller Williams Platinum Partners

Recent Posts

    latest blogs

    • Community
    • National