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Examiner
  • Carbon dioxide and water vapor pose no threat

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  • Wayne Wagner
    Independence
    To the editor:
    Three gases are essential to life on earth: oxygen, water vapor and carbon dioxide. Without anyone of these, we die. This fact is not new. Grammar school science students are taught this. They are also taught that all three are invisible, colorless and odorless.
    It is hard to understand why a movement with any intelligence would try to outlaw any of these gases essential to life. Whoever they are, they are on an agenda. At this writing, they appear to be having some success. How do they expect to succeed? The following facts and tactics may explain.
    The products of combustion are water vapor and carbon dioxide. In the bad old days there was a lot of soot, but not any more. When steam leaves the stack (chimney) it cools and becomes a cloud. The sun hitting from above makes the cloud look white from above, from below the cloud is dark because the sunlight has scattered. So “let’s scare the public” – “look at all that awful CO2 being exhausted into our atmosphere.” Remember the fourth grade – CO2 is invisible.
    This same tactic of water vapor cooling into a cloud has been used as a scare for nuclear-fueled electric generating steam plants. “Oh look at what is coming out of that plant.” All the while just H2O discharging from a cooling tower.
    Another current tactic is repeating over and over and statements such as “CO2 is a pollutant” when actually CO2 is not a pollutant and is beneficial to this planet. For anyone not knowing this, I recommend an informative book titled, “The Many Benefits of Atmospheric CO2 Enrichment.”
    So where does this all leave the public? With the EPA pressing for carbon limits when it should be pressing for carbon increases. To clarify, this discussion is about CO2, a gas, and none of the above is about carbon the solid. It also should be noted that long before the current agenda, the bad stuff discharging from the boiler stack, such as soot, mercury, etc., had been limited to safe levels.
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