The House debate preceding passing of the Health Care bill was much like a religious service. Fervent faith in the bill’s authors and content was evident in the bill’s “Amen corner” of praising boosters.

Believer: “I believe the Bible from cover to cover!”

Agnostic: “Have you read the Bible from cover to cover?”

Believer: “No, but God said it, I believe it, and that settles it!”

Boundless faith such as in the above can arise from enthusiasm alone, needing neither proof nor reason. It may be commendable, as religion.

The House debate preceding passing of the Health Care bill was much like a religious service. Fervent faith in the bill’s authors and content was evident in the bill’s “Amen corner” of praising boosters. Enthusiasm for imminent passage displaced any need for mere knowledge of its provisions as zeal elbowed aside all cautionary pleadings.

Bill’s boosters: “We believe this bill from cover to cover!” was the implied sentiment.

Rep. Boehner: “Have any of you read the bill?”

Bill’s boosters: “No, but somebody wrote, it, we believe it, and that settles it!” was the implication by intervening seconds of silence.

“Hell no you haven’t,” Rep. Boehner then thundered, affirming the obvious.

Separation of church and state supposedly means government by reason and common sense based on facts, instead of blind faith or enthusiasm alone. Some proponents claim both good and bad things are in the bill, but God only knows what the bad things are if nobody read it. Hopefully reason can somehow prevail to find a way for health care reform to truly benefit Americans, despite its hidden flaws.

Otherwise, welcome believers to the new “Religion of Health Care,” as demonstrated and founded by Congress March 21, the latest “faith-based” initiative.