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Examiner
  • 5 things to know about Dr. Seuss

  • With “The Cat in the Hat,” “Oh the Places You Go” and “The Lorax,” almost everyone has read a book from the man who brought green eggs and ham into the world’s vocabulary.

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  • With “The Cat in the Hat,” “Oh the Places You Go” and “The Lorax,” almost everyone has read a book from the man who brought green eggs and ham into the world’s vocabulary.
    Saturday marks Dr. Seuss’s 109th birthday, and in honor, schools throughout the United States are participating in Read Across America. Sponsored by the National Education Association, the idea of the program is to motivate children and teenagers to read. This is done through events such as special guests reading to classrooms.
    “This event is important because these kids are future Chiefs fans, and it’s the right thing to do,” said Ted Crews, vice president of communications for the Kansas City Chiefs. “It’s also what our organization likes to do.”
    Crews, along with KC Wolf, visited Three Trails Elementary School in Independence to read two books, one of which was by Dr. Seuss, Friday as part of Read Across America Day.
    “’The Cat in the Hat’ is my favorite book,” he said of his selection. “I read it to my own kids.”
    Below are interesting facts The Examiner has compiled about Dr. Seuss.
    5 His first book
    Dr. Seuss’s first book might not be one that is heard of very often. “And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street” was published in 1937, launching his career. According to History.com, it was a chance encounter with a friend turned publishing company editor on Mulberry Street that led to the book.
    4 Popular children’s author
    Clearly, Dr. Seuss has written a lot of books. In a list of the all-time best-selling children’s books, created by “Publisher’s Weekly,” “Green Eggs and Ham” ranked in the top 5. “The Cat in the Hat,” “One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish,” “Hop on Pop,” “Oh, the Places You Go” and “Dr. Seuss’s ABC” also appeared in the top 20.
    3 Writing for Uncle Sam
    Shortly after beginning his writing career, Dr. Seuss began writing for the U.S. Army. According to History.com, he produced animated training films, documentaries and booklets during World War II, working right alongside Chuck Jones and Friz Freleng, animation directors from Warner Bros.
    2 Drawing cartoons
    In addition to writing, Dr. Seuss drew more than 400 editorial cartoons between 1940 and 1942 for the liberal newspaper, “PM.” Some of the cartoons showed stereotypical and inflammatory depiction of Japanese leaders.
    1 Dr. Seuss is not his real name
    Dr. Seuss was born Theodor Seuss Geisel, the grandson of German immigrants. Seuss was the maiden name of Geisel’s mother. He started using the pseudonym after being fired as the editor-in-chief of Dartmouth’s humor magazine. Seuss continued to draw cartoons using different names so that he would not be noticed such as “T. Seuss” and “Seuss.”
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