Paul M. Edwards, 77, is a senior fellow and founder of the Center for the Study of the Korean War, at Graceland University’s Independence Campus. Edwards, who served the U.S. Army Artillery from 1953 to 1955 and is a Korean War veteran, was working at the Turner Meat Market in Lawrence, Kan., on June 25, 1950, when the war began. He started the Center for the Study of the Korean War in the 1980s when he began writing about the war and found few reliable sources.

Paul M. Edwards, 77, is a senior fellow and founder of the Center for the Study of the Korean War, at Graceland University’s Independence Campus. Edwards, who served the U.S. Army Artillery from 1953 to 1955 and is a Korean War veteran, was working at the Turner Meat Market in Lawrence, Kan., on June 25, 1950, when the war began. He started the Center for the Study of the Korean War in the 1980s when he began writing about the war and found few reliable sources.

1 What are the lasting memories you have from your service in the Korean War?

I think the most impressive was the cold. It was so desperately cold. It was a surprise for all of us, I think. When the wind comes down off of Siberia, it gets down to 40 below (degrees Fahrenheit). The whole experience was uncomfortable, but that’s about it.

2 Briefly, how did the Korean War shape the world as we know it today?

That’s a really good question. It was a major watershed between Americans’ attitude about war. We went from fighting for victory to fighting for political position. In terms of the military, it was a transition between a conventional fight and then the electronics of the Korean War.

3 What effect do you hope the Center for the Study of the Korean War will have on the greater community?

Our major concern is that you remember the war and its primary causes. Our primary goal is to seek peace through the understanding of war and also remember those who served there.

4 Why do you think the Korean conflict is often referred to as “The Forgotten War” and “The Unknown War”?

I prefer to use the word “ignored.” I think people remember the war; they just don’t recognize its importance. It came so close to World War II, and I think most of America preferred to just not pay attention to it.

5 How could American classrooms do a better job of incorporating the study of the Korean War?

In the first place, they need to mention it. I think the tendency is that war is a place of violence and pain, and they don’t want kids to hear about it. I think it’s important to mention it and show the degree to which it played with America’s involvement in politics. I would like to see it reintroduced into textbooks since it receives very short coverage in textbooks.