Gen. Stanley McChrystal learned the hard way Wednesday what Gen. Douglas MacArthur learned the hard way in 1951. You can push your commander in chief only so far.

Gen. Stanley McChrystal learned the hard way Wednesday what Gen. Douglas MacArthur learned the hard way in 1951. You can push your commander in chief only so far.

McChrystal’s scornful remarks – published in a Rolling Stone magazine profile – about the civilian leadership in the White House were the last straw for President Obama.

MacArthur’s continued efforts to run the war in Korea according to his own will, not the president’s, culminated in a plan to undermine Truman’s policies toward China that became Truman’s last straw.

Both generals were relieved of their duties in the midst of war. Each was  popular with the American public. But each forgot that since George Washington, the civilians in D.C, not the generals, run the show. And it must be that way or we lose who we are as Americans.

President Obama, like President  Truman, did what he had to do and it was the right thing.

Another GateHouse paper offered a bit of advice to Gen. McChrystal: Read this poem and take it to heart, general.
 

 

Indispensable Man

by Saxon White Kessinger


Sometime when you're feeling important;

Sometime when your ego's in bloom

Sometime when you take it for granted

You're the best qualified in the room,



Sometime when you feel that your going

Would leave an unfillable hole,

Just follow these simple instructions

And see how they humble your soul;



Take a bucket and fill it with water,

Put your hand in it up to the wrist,

Pull it out and the hole that's remaining

Is a measure of how much you'll be missed.



You can splash all you wish when you enter,

You may stir up the water galore,

But stop, and you'll find that in no time

It looks quite the same as before.



The moral of this quaint example

Is to do just the best that you can,

Be proud of yourself but remember,

There's no indispensable man.