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Examiner
  • 100 years ago - Oct. 20-26, 1912

  • The following items were taken from the Oct. 20 through 26, 1912, Examiner.

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  • The following items were taken from the Oct. 20 through 26, 1912, Examiner.
    Sylvester Akers, a prominent farmer and live stock man, whose home is near Six Mile Baptist Church, died Oct. 20. He served as a blacksmith and took wagon trains across the plains for several years before the Civil War. He served for a time under Quantrill and later he enlisted under Gen. Shelby, took part in the battle of Wilson’s Creek and Prairie Grove, and was with Price when the great Confederate leader passed through this county in 1864.
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    A great red glare in the northwestern sky caused the impression that the oil refinery at Sugar Creek was burning; however, this was not the case. The burning property was the big buildings of the Standard Warehouse Company, dealers in hay and coal; and the stock of the Badger Lumber Company, which has a branch in Sugar Creek. The warehouse and its contents were a total loss. The lumber yard was on Fairmount Avenue, and the warehouse was on Kentucky Avenue.
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    Probably the most discussed proposition in a generation in constitutional amendments for Missouri, except the prohibition amendment, is number 6, submitted for a vote at the coming election. This is the famous single tax amendment, so called. The text follows: Providing for raising all revenue by taxes on land, inheritances and franchises for public service utilities; exempting from taxation all personal property and improvements on land; abolishing poll taxes and occupation taxes for revenue purposes; abolishing the constitutional limitation upon the rates of taxation for state, county, school and municipal purposes and providing that the laws regulating the manufacture and sale of intoxicating liquors shall remain unaffected hereby.
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    Jack Kennedy was released from the Missouri State Penitentiary Oct. 22. He served 12 years of a 17 year sentence for train robbery in Wright County. His mother, Mrs. Bridgett Kennedy, who formerly lived near Selsa, now lives in Kansas City. He was sent up from Wright County on a charge of having robbed the Kansas City, Fort Scott & Memphis train near Macomb on Jan. 3, 1899. Previous to that time he had been arrested several times on suspicion of being a train robber, but had always succeeded in getting out of trouble
    – Jillayne Ritchie
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