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Examiner
  • Walk a bit for better health

  • A good walk can a make a big difference in health, and the city of Independence is offering weekly walks that also introduce people to city parks and other attractions.

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  • A good walk can a make a big difference in health, and the city of Independence is offering weekly walks that also introduce people to city parks and other attractions.
    “The Mile Starts Here” continues today and every Wenesday through October.
    “It’s actually going really well,” said Christina Heinen, coordinator of the city’s Building a Healthier Independence program, adding that about 25 people came last week.
    Participants gather at 9 a.m. and walk a loop of about one mile. Most adults, Heinen pointed out, are encouraged to get 30 to 60 minutes of physical activity a day. “This is your 30 minutes for that day,” she said.
    The city has five routes:
    • Today, and each first Wednesday of the month, walkers gather at the farmers market at Truman Road and Main Street and follow the Truman Historic Walking Trail.
    • On June 12 and each second Wednesday, walkers gather in the Centerpoint Medical Center parking lot off Jackson Drive at the medical offices entrance. They walk the Centerpoint Medical Center Trail.
    • On June 19 and each third Wednesday, walkers gather at the Independence Athletic Complex, 17800 E. Salisbury Road.
    • On June 26 and each fourth Wednesday, walkers gather at Waterfall Park on Bass Pro Drive near Bass Pro Shops.
    • On the two fifth Wednesdays – July 31 and Oct. 30 – walkers gather at the front entrance of the city Health Department, 515 S. Liberty St., a couple of blocks south of the Square.
    In addition to promoting the benefits of walking – less stress, weight loss, lower risk of stroke and heart disease – the city hopes to familiarize people with city parks in hopes that they’ll come back, use those facilities and stay active. Studies suggest people do that when they get to know a park, Heinen said.
    Walkers also are given pedometers if they want them. Those are worn in the belt area and measure each step taken. Health officials encourage people to take 10,000 steps a day.
    “A lot of people,” Heinen said, “are shocked by how little they walk.”
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