In response to Andre Riley’s column on Tuesday, (“It’s none of your business”). I agree we all should have our own private lives. But when someone is in the media spotlight like sports figures or movie stars or even politicians, their lives influence many others.

In response to Andre Riley’s column on Tuesday, (“It’s none of your business”). I agree we all should have our own private lives. But when someone is in the media spotlight like sports figures or movie stars or even politicians, their lives influence many others. My concerns is not for adults as much as for the impressionable minds of young people. They can too often justify their own actions by the actions of others who are given media attention. Our children are fed a steady diet of sex and violence by the media and then when they copy those acts, we say we don’t know why. Mr. Riley says, “Living the in the public eye doesn’t automatically make one more accountable for his actions than you or me. If someone you consider a role model takes an action you don’t agree with, get a new role model.”

The names he refers to in his article are only the tip of the iceberg, and the more they are reported, the more they tempt others to do the same. I call this “the law of justification.” If it’s all right for you to do it, it’s all right for me to do it. I am sure Mr. Riley would decry the coarsening of society as quickly as anyone, but in the next breath defend the very thing he is protecting that helps coarsen society. That’s like saying, “Don’t do as I do, do as I say.” We all know how well that works. What you do in your home is your business, but what you do in public is the public’s business. Defending a wrong that is done is like saying two wrongs make a right. Mr. Riley, please help us create a more civil society instead of defending the very things.