The city of Independence Public Works Department is aiming to cooperate with entities like public utilities in significant infrastructure improvements.

The city of Independence Public Works Department is aiming to cooperate with entities like public utilities in significant infrastructure improvements.

John Powell, city director of public works, emphasized the collaboration among utility departments and public works on four infrastructure improvements Monday night during his monthly presentation at the Independence City Council study session. By working together, the city can avoid instances of remarking pavement just before a utility needs to dig that pavement up for improvements, District 2 Council Member Will Swoffer said as an example.  

Powell provided updates on Missouri 7 improvements, the Queen Ridge stormwater project, the 39th Street improvements and the 39th and Main streets stormwater project.

 

MISSOURI 7: The Missouri 7 project includes the construction of three new left turn lanes and overlay from Pink Hill Road to U.S. 24.

The project features include constructing a new turn lane at Bundschu, Truman and Strode roads; overlay from Pink Hill Road to U.S. 24; and the widening and paving of the shoulder area. Strode Road at Missouri 7 was relocated to improve sight distance, Powell said.

“(Missouri) 7 Highway had a lot of pavement needs before this project started, and we expect that will improve,” said Powell, calling smoother streets, safer traffic flow and improved appearance among the project’s benefits.

The Missouri Department of Transportation funded most of the $2.41 million project costs while the city license surcharge funds provided $150,000 for the left turn lane at Strode Road. (MoDOT provided funds for the left turn lanes at Truman and Bundschu roads, as well as serving as the project’s design engineer.)

The project is 75 percent complete and is scheduled for completion this fall, Powell said.
 

QUEEN RIDGE STORMWATER: Now in Phase II of construction, the current Queen Ridge stormwater and sanitary sewer systems replacement construction affects the neighborhood between Gudgell Road and East 28th Terrace Court.

Phase II improvements include 880 feet of new drainage pipe, four drainage inlets, 750 feet of new sewer pipe and five sewer manholes. The project also includes additional gabion walls, which are wire baskets filled with rock, stacked to protect drainage channels and to prevent creek beds from washing out, Powell said.

Similar to many city stormwater projects, potential benefits will include flooding control in a residential area, sanitary sewer improvements and long-needed neighborhood improvements, Powell said. The city’s recently renewed stormwater sales tax provided the $930,000 in project funding.

Phase II is 90 percent complete and is scheduled for completion this fall, Powell said. City utilities partnered with public works in relocating during construction.
 

39TH STREET IMPROVEMENTS: Though construction has yet to begin, this project will include widening 39th Street from Crysler Avenue to Noland Road to three lanes. This additional lane will provide a center turn lane for traffic.

Other features include curbs and gutter improvements; construction of sidewalks on both sides of the street; and improved utilities, storm drainage and street lighting. Powell said improved traffic flow and safety, pedestrian safety and an improved appearance are among the potential benefits.

The $3.2 million project costs included design, land acquisition and construction and was funded through multiple sources. Missouri Surface Transportation Program funds provided $1.5 million; the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act provided $1 million; and the city’s street sales tax fund and the county urban road system provided the remaining funds.

The improvements are slated for completion in fall 2011, Powell said. City utilities also partnered with public works in their relocation.


39TH AND MAIN STREETS STORMWATER: This project also has yet to begin construction, and the city will coordinate it with the 39th Street improvements project, Powell said. Residential neighborhoods surrounding Main, Osage and Liberty streets will receive stormwater improvements including 1,800 feet of storm pipes, 25 inlets and street and yard repairs.   

“It’s something that’s been asked about in this neighborhood for many years,” Powell said of the upcoming project that will be completed in spring 2011.

Again, city utilities will partner in this project. The stormwater sales tax provided $580,000 in funding.