Van Horn High School reminisces a memorable time of hair flips, retro day dresses and Motown music in their performance of “Little Shop of Horrors.” An Off-Broadway production opened in 1982, introducing new song favorites such as “Skid Row (Downtown)” and “Suddenly Seymour.”

Van Horn High School reminisces a memorable time of hair flips, retro day dresses and Motown music in their performance of “Little Shop of Horrors.” An Off-Broadway production opened in 1982, introducing new song favorites such as “Skid Row (Downtown)” and “Suddenly Seymour.”

“Little Shop of Horrors” was written by Howard Ashman, with music by Alan Menken. The story originally began as a spoof of 1950s Sci Fi B-Movies, which originated from the fear of the Soviet Union and communism. Set in the early 1960s, the plotline revolves around nerdy florist, Seymour and his chance for success and unexpected romance, with the help of a giant man-eating plant who constantly demands to be fed.

Justin Moore and Christen Barber play the roles of a bashful, adorable Seymour and a sweet, naïve Audrey. As the storyline unfolds, so does their affection toward one another. Moore and Barber create a believable and entertaining duo, effectively contributing to their characters. Moore’s mannerisms and portrayal of Seymour’s love for Audrey brings all eyes to him. His demanding and full voice contradicted the shy façade of his character. Moore’s song, “Grow For Me,” is sung memorably and draws in the audience. Barber’s superior voice is especially pleasing in such songs as “Somewhere That’s Green” and “Suddenly Seymour.”

Also noteworthy is the vocal talent of Kevin Alessio-Hidalgo as Audrey II. Hidalgo shows great talent and diversity as he executes mastery of characterization. He brightens the stage with a strong, soulful voice that carries throughout the au ditorium.

Another pleasurable performance was that of Jacob Solumas Orin Scrivello. This dentist calls for a bad boy attitude with a passionate voice. Solum portrays these characteristics with ease as his superior dancing and controlled voice shines.

One of the most amazing technical aspects of the show is the “costume” for Audrey II. It is nice to watch the plant gradually grow throughout the show, making it seem even more realistic. Jesse Buhrman and Grafton Solomon use perfect mechanics to operate the plant and bring it to life. The lighting during the scenes where Audrey II devours the likes of Mr. Mushnik and Orin Scrivello sets a gloomy mood that sends chills up audience spines.

There are some unfortunate technical problems presented with the microphones and articulation from the actors. Lines are sometimes lost, as well as the vocal parts. A few unfinished pieces on the set also distract from the performances onstage. The doo-wop girls, however, do present themselves with considerable energy and carry the show, making up for lacking energy from others.

Van Horn High School produces a pleasing production of “Little Shop of Horrors,” certain of recognition and well worth the time.