We have a tradition at my household. Perhaps your family adheres to it as well. It’s called the “Celebrate Thanksgiving before getting sucked into Christmas” tradition.

We have a tradition at my household. Perhaps your family adheres to it as well.

It’s called the “Celebrate Thanksgiving before getting sucked into Christmas” tradition.

It’s an age-old custom in which one acknowledges that there is actually a holiday between Halloween and Christmas. I know this is a lot to take in; try to stay with me.

Long ago, the gentle Pilgrims travelled to the New World in search of religious freedom and succulent turkey dinners. They arrived to find this great land not all as it was described by their travel agent but decided to try to make the most of it, which turned out to be a less-than-stellar idea.

Winter, as it turned out, is a lot harder to get through without adequate food, shelter, sanitation facilities, medical know-how, or blankets. Lots of colonists died. As any true New Englander would attest, they were probably a bunch of Midwestern pansies.

When spring finally came, the handful remaining were so relieved to be Not Dead that they decided to celebrate by eating.

They invited their Indian neighbors over, because that’s the polite thing to do when you’re new in town. The Indians brought the turkeys the colonists had been looking for, so they all became best friends forever.

The End.

Thanksgiving is a lovely holiday. Even though Christmas is clearly superior (the holiday of feasting and gifting), Thanksgiving deserves its own special place in our hearts.

After all, without Thanksgiving, we wouldn’t have Black Friday, and everyone knows that fighting the crowds is really worth it, because you can get some pretty sweet deals. No one can say no to getting up at 4 a.m. for the sake of a $3 toaster. I don’t even need a toaster and I’d get up for that bargain.

Of course, I jest. (I do need a toaster.)

I actually do like Thanksgiving. It’s a holiday that seems to have fewer strings attached; just me, my family, lots of food, lots of laughs. It’s a little break in the middle of the Christmas parade that started rolling in around August.  

As someone who’s not crazy for turkey or green bean casserole, I enjoy Thanksgiving because I get to see my family all together and sharing a sacred social convention: a meal. To break bread with someone is to trust them, on one level or another. On Thanksgiving, we break bread with those closest to us.

Food for thought. Happy Thanksgiving.