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Examiner
  • Lynn Youngblood: Every little act of recycling helps

  • As my dad used to say, “Who’da thunk it?”


    Thursday is America Recycles Day. I had no idea. I was looking some stuff up the other day and came across this information. On Nov. 15, 2004, George W. Bush proclaimed that this day would be America Recycles Day.

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  • As my dad used to say, “Who’da thunk it?”
    Thursday is America Recycles Day. I had no idea. I was looking some stuff up the other day and came across this information. On Nov. 15, 2004, George W. Bush proclaimed that this day would be America Recycles Day.
    According to the National Recycling Coalition, the day “is dedicated to encouraging Americans to recycle, and buy recycled products.”
    The idea actually was begun in Texas in 1997 by Kevin Tuerff and Valerie Davis of EnviroMedia. Thursday’s activities are based on the successful Texas Recycles Day program, bringing together state recycling coordinators from throughout the country, along with the U.S.
    Environmental Protection Agency, the Office of the Federal Environmental Executive, the National Recycling Coalition, the U.S. Postal Service and the Steel Recycling Institute, among others.
    Now, 38 states join as partners promoting and supporting America Recycles Day. Proudly, Missouri is among them.
    The national recycling rate is at 34 percent. Recycling 75 percent of the nation’s waste would create nearly 1.5 million jobs by 2030, according to the Tellus Institute with Sound Resource Management.
    “Recycling is the easiest thing we can all do to improve our community, conserve natural resources and create green jobs. Collectively, we aim to make recycling bigger and better 365 days a year,” said Brenda Pulley, senior vice president of recycling at Keep America Beautiful and national program manager for America Recycles Day.
    America Recycles Day is about promoting recycling, so recycling centers are going to be working overtime.
    Volunteers will be out helping folks unload their cars and trucks of newspapers, aluminum, plastic and all kinds of recycled items. Throughout November, it is estimated that 2 million people will join in the celebration.
    Let us not forget the serious side of why recycling really matters. A recycling rate of 34 percent constitutes a multi-billion dollar industry that employs millions of Americans and helps to advance our clean-energy economy.
    It takes the people – you and me – to make it all happen. Through the simple acts of recycling and buying recycled products, it is the people who make the choices to close the loop and make the circle complete, filling the supply chain of recycled materials that help fuel our economy.
    You can be one of those who make a difference. Do you stand over your trash can and throw all of your aluminum and plastic away? According to the nonprofit organization As You Sow, the value of discarded packaging in the United States is more than $11 billion.
    If you have ever wondered if you really make a difference with the one aluminum can you throw away, think about it like this. The number of cans recycled every 30 seconds equals the number of people who could fill an entire pro football stadium. And recycling just one aluminum can saves the equivalent energy of powering a 46-inch LED TV for three hours. A glass container can go from the recycling bin to a store shelf in as few as 30 days. The decision you make does matter – make the right choice!
    Page 2 of 2 - Reach Lynn Youngblood at TheGreenSpace@sbcglobal.net.
     

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