|
|
Examiner
  • 5 ways to de-stress for the holidays

  • Here come the holidays.


    All that food. All that tradition. All that spending. All those expectations.


    All that stress.

    • email print
  • Here come the holidays.
    All that food. All that tradition. All that spending. All those expectations.
    All that stress.
    Experts suggest a few things you can do to ease the stress of the holiday season.
    1. Celebrate the simple things. Lucy Schraeder is coordinator of the Building Strong Families Program through the University of Missouri Extension. Her suggestions: Celebrate one good thing every day, remember that kind words and acts go a long way, be nice to family members struggling with changes to routines or health behaviors, be realistic and communicate upfront about what the family can do, identify the traditions that are most important and the ones that can be skipped, figure out who’s doing all those chores – and take a slow, deep breath several times a day.
    2. Find time for face time. Groups such as the Million Minute Family Challenge encourage friends and families to sit down and play a board game and clock your minutes at www.millionminute.com. Organizers say they surpassed 1 million minutes in 2011. As of Friday, participants in the U.S. and Canada were close to 400,000 minutes for 2012, including 46,344 minutes in Missouri – the third highest rated state or province.
    3. Know your feelings. For some people, the holidays can bring on the blues, and that can be especially true for those who have recently lost a loved one. The Mayo Clinic has several suggestions: Acknowledge your feelings, and recognize that grief is normal. Reach out to family, church or others if you feel isolated. Be realistic and know families change, as do traditions and rituals. Try to set aside differences with family and friends. Stick to a budget for holiday shopping, and set aside time for all that work in the kitchen, wrapping presents, etc. Learn to say no. Stick with your healthy habits such as exercise, and find time for yourself.
    4. Snooze. The folks at The Happiness Project have this simple reminder: “Get enough sleep. Sleep deprivation is a major disturber of people’s moods. Jet lag, traveling, parties, and over-excited children all make it hard to get your usual number of hours. Making an effort to get to bed at a decent hour really pays off.”
    5. Remember what it’s about. “Fill your heart with love,” says The Happiness Project. “ ...  If you’re heading into a difficult situation, take a moment to fill your heart with love. Think of all the reasons that you’re grateful to your family and friends, and the happy memories you’ve shared, and how things might look from other people’s perspectives. This can be hard to do, but it will make you happier.”
     
      • calendar