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Examiner
  • Take care during hot, humid weather

  • The season of ice water and shade is here.



    The National Weather Service predicts highs in the 90s again today for the metro area and heat indices that could be near 100. It was 91 officially Tuesday at Kansas City International Airport, but the Weather Service also recorded 96 at the downtown airport.

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  • The season of ice water and shade is here.
    The National Weather Service predicts highs in the 90s again today for the metro area and heat indices that could be near 100. It was 91 officially Tuesday at Kansas City International Airport, but the Weather Service also recorded 96 at the downtown airport.
    The combination of heat and humidity so common this time of year means taking precautions such as drinking plenty of water and avoiding overexertion when outdoors. Any heat index reading of 91 or higher means it’s time to start exercising caution, and at about 103 a significant toll on the human body can occur.
    For Eastern Jackson County, look for a high today of 93 and a heat index as high as 98. It’ll be windy, and the warm wind out of the south-southwest could gust to 31 mph.
    Then the two-day burst of heat is over. Tonight’s low should be around 68, followed by highs of 85 Thursday and Friday. It’s back to 90 Saturday, and there’s a chance of showers and thunderstorms through the weekend.
    The Weather Service also points out that nationwide about 175 people die of heat-related illnesses in an average year, a leading cause of weather-related deaths.
    For those working outside, officials advise slowing down and taking regular breaks. Wear lightweight clothing, and stay hydrated. Water is best, and caffeinated drinks don’t help very much. Check on family, friends and neighbors, and make sure outdoor pets have shade and fresh water.
    The Weather Service also suggests:
    • Cut back on, reschedule or just skip strenuous outdoor activities. Try to do them in the coolest part of the day.
    • Eat light. The body needs protein, but protein also increases metabolic heat production and water loss.
    • Drink water even if you don’t feel thirsty. Your body needs it to keep cool.
    • Do not drink alcoholic beverages.
    • Skip salt tablets unless specified by a physician.
    • Spend some time each day in air-conditioned spaces. That significantly reduces danger from the heat.
    It also helps to be familiar with some of the effects of heat and humidity.
    Heat exhaustion is marked by heavy sweating, weakness, and skin that’s cold, pale and clammy. There can be fainting and vomiting. Get the person out of sun, and have him or her lay down. Loosen clothing, and apply cool, wet cloths. Use a fan, or move victim to an air-conditioned room. Give sips of water, but if nausea occurs, discontinue. If vomiting continues, seek immediate medical attention.
    Heat stroke, or sunstroke, means the body temperate is 106 or higher. The skin is hot and dry, and there is a rapid, strong pulse. The person can become unconsciousness. Get medical attention, call 911 or get the person to the hospital at once. Get the person to a cooler place, and reduce the body temperature with a cold bath or sponges. Remove clothing, and use fans or air conditioning.
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