Not knowing how he’d react, I walked into his office with sweaty palms and racing heart, and a rash was quickly spreading up my neck. Thank goodness I wore a turtleneck.

Not knowing how he’d react, I walked into his office with sweaty palms and racing heart, and a rash was quickly spreading up my neck. Thank goodness I wore a turtleneck.

I can count on one hand how many times I’ve even been to our publisher’s office, as I don’t typically involve myself in anything other than doing my job or helping co-workers meet the daily deadlines that come with producing a new and different product each and every day. The constant stress of it all is what kept me in the same career for the past 30 years, and I’ve loved every minute of it.

Knowing his day gets busy minutes after he arrives, I wanted to get in there before anyone else and before his phone started to ring. I rehearsed my speech once more in my head, gathered up my papers and marched in there, trying to muster up confidence so I didn’t look like I was about to have a nervous breakdown.

My speech came down to just one sentence, as I tried to sum it up quickly so I wouldn’t have a heart attack and end up slumped over his desk.

“I love my job, but I’m giving my notice.”

Friday is my last day to sit at a desk amidst the hustle and bustle of newspaper life, although I’m not leaving the “family,” I’m just moving out, on my own.

Publisher Steve Curd graciously accepted my resignation and lifted the guilt I was feeling for moving onto another chapter in my life. Knowing the love and passion I have for this newspaper, he agreed to my proposal to continue writing this column as well as articles for special sections. I can’t thank him enough for understanding my decision and allowing me to continue contributing to the paper.

This column isn’t big enough for me to thank all of my past and current co-workers who are, and always will be, part of my life. The Examiner has been my rock, my foundation for the past 30 years and I will be forever in debt to these people who helped me through times of sorrow as well as to share my happiness. They may not be co-workers any longer, but they will always be lifelong friends.

I’m so fortunate to have had the chance to “grow up” within the confines of the newspaper way of life. They say ink runs through the veins of true newspaper people and I would know, as I’ve never wanted to do anything else besides work here.

I contemplated whether or not I should reveal this new chapter in my life, since I could have continued on, week after week, and who would know the difference whether I was writing this from the office or home.

Since beginning this column eight years ago, I’ve written about my life – good and bad, and it’s always been the honest-to-goodness truth, which at times, was probably more information than I needed to share with the public. If I can’t write from the heart, I won’t write at all.

The story continues next week – same place, same day – as I begin a new adventure.