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Examiner
  • L.J.’s hip-hop act doesn’t play in KC

  • “Don’t shed a tear, ‘cause mama I ain’t happy here.”

    The infamous words from late rap artist Tupac Shakur’s “I Ain’t Mad At ‘Cha” single could just as easy be used to describe the dilemma that Kansas City Chiefs running back Larry Johnson finds himself in here in Kansas City.

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  • “Don’t shed a tear, ‘cause mama I ain’t happy here.”
    The infamous words from late rap artist Tupac Shakur’s “I Ain’t Mad At ‘Cha” single could just as easy be used to describe the dilemma that Kansas City Chiefs running back Larry Johnson finds himself in here in Kansas City.
    The loathing, brooding, eccentric, egotistical, mercurial and now in exile running back is East-Coast born and bred, East-Coast affiliated and East-Coast biased.
    L.J.’s big city schtick here in the middle of the map has never played well. The hipster has caused Chiefs fans to rip up season tickets, hack out unsavory blogs and post comments unheard of in the new-age era of modern-day media.
    In trying to understand Johnson’s choice to utter derogatory comments at local scribes, post asinine Tweets about his head coach’s football cred or any other gripe the man can muster is a complete waste of time.
    Simply put, Johnson is not a happy camper here in the City of Fountains and he wants out.
    Long ago, L.J. screamed at the top of his lungs that Kansas City wasn’t ready for him. By the time the Pro Bowl running back dropped a quarter of a million dollars on a chauffeur-included Maybach, Chiefs fans were outdone.
    Johnson is all hip-hop, all the time in a market that quite honestly doesn’t support hip-hop culture or the antics that come with it – fancy cars, jaw-dropping threads, pistol-packing goons, diamond encrusted jewelry and wads and wads of personal petty cash.
    Johnson is pure Broadway. He is straight Times Square masquerading around in a Cow Town (no offense Kansas Citians, my hometown of St. Louis is a Cow Town, too). L.J. doesn’t fit in here, he doesn’t fit in the Chiefs’ locker room and he surely doesn’t fit in any of the Chiefs’ future plans.
    The best thing to do is give the man what he wants and let him go someplace not as conservative and stifling as Kansas City.
    • A few days after the St. Louis Cardinals were eliminated in the National League Division Series by the Los Angles Dodgers, I told Examiner sports editor Karl Zinke that I thought the Cardinals would find a scapegoat for not advancing in hitting coach Hal McRae, the former Royals manager.
    Karl dismissed the notion but did add that the Royals should pick McRae up if the Cardinals did send him packing.
    Call it a hunch or call it St. Louis manager Tony La Russa’s modus operandi, but I saw the writing on the wall. Too many Cardinal hitters came up short against the Dodgers for McRae to survive. I knew La Russa would not get rid of his sidekick, pitching coach Dave Duncan, and I knew first-base coach John McKay and third-base coach Jose Oquendo were solid.
    Page 2 of 2 - The odd man out? McRae. He will be replaced by Mark McGwire.
    As a native St. Louisan and professed Cardinals fan, I am not at all happy about the move. I’m not a Big Mac fan, and it has nothing to do with steroid allegations.
    My disdain has to do with the fact that the city of St. Louis actually named a part of Interstate 70 after McGwire when I can think of dozens of different former Cardinals off the top of my head that better deserved that honor.
    Big Mac brought a lot of attention to St. Louis during his time there and even gave money to charities there. But, he never brought to the city what the city expects from its baseball team – a championship.
    I say La Russa erred in letting go of McRae. The Cardinals never finished lower than fifth in National League team batting average during McRae’s five-year tenure in St. Louis.
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