Tomorrow is Thanksgiving and the end of a month full of thankfulness. My last expression of thankfulness, which should have been the first column in November, is centered on prayer.

Tomorrow is Thanksgiving and the end of a month full of thankfulness. My last expression of thankfulness, which should have been the first column in November, is centered on prayer.

Recently, I passed a church sign that read, “As long as teachers give tests, there will always be prayer in schools.”

In spite of prayer being taken from school, how are you and your family doing with prayer? Let’s step back in history for a moment.

What source of power did Moses use as he stretched his arm toward the Red Sea and caused the waters to roll back and his people to cross on dry land?     

What power did David call upon as he walked toward Goliath?

Columbus sailed from Spain, and after several months there was mutiny on the Pinta and Nina. He was told that if land was not sighted within so many hours, they would turn around and go back.

Columbus said that he went into the cabin and prayed mightily to God, and on that dark night, October 12, 1492, a small island was sighted, and they named it San Salvador, meaning Holy Redeemer.

George Washington, father of our country, was on his knees at Valley Forge, seeking the spirit and the direction of God.

Abraham Lincoln, as he stood on the platform of the train as it left Springfield, Ill., for Washington, D.C., where he was to be President of the United States, said this: “Without the assistance of that Divine Being … , I cannot succeed. With that assistance, I cannot fail”

I heard prayer, spoken repeatedly, until the 33 Chilean miners were rescued.

We are to pray for our enemies. We are to pray for protection. We should pray to overcome temptation.

I found the following definition of prayer in the Bible Dictionary, “The object of prayer is not to change the will of God, but to secure for ourselves and for others, blessings that God is already willing to grant, but that are made conditional on our asking for them.”

Readers, we spend many hours a day in communication via the phone, Internet, Facebook e-mail, text, blog, Skype, or Twitter.

Instead, we should take the time, at the beginning, ending, and all through the day . . . in the most important form of communication, a cost-free life-changing method for communication to a loving Heavenly Father.

We simply need to get down on our knees.

Eliza M Hickock’s poem expresses it best:



I know not by what method rare,

But this I know, God answers prayer.

I know that He has given His word

That tells me prayer is always heard

And will be answered, soon or late,

And so I pray and calmly wait.

I know not if the blessing sought

Will come just in the way I thought,

But leave my prayers with Him alone,

Whose ways are wiser than my own –

Assured that He will grant my quest,

Or send some answer far more blessed.



Enjoy your Thanksgiving.