First came a red light camera on Missouri 291. Now people driving through Sugar Creek will be watching out for a speed tracking system to catch those who drive faster than the posted speed limit.

First came a red light camera on Missouri 291. Now people driving through Sugar Creek will be watching out for a speed tracking system to catch those who drive faster than the posted speed limit.

The Sugar Creek Board of Aldermen approved an ordinance Monday that will allow the city to enter into an agreement with B&W Sensors L.L.C. The agreement allows the Sugar Creek Police Department to place the equipment in places where speeding is a problem.

“There is a definite speeding problem in areas of town that we are concerned about,” said Herb Soule, Chief of Police of the Sugar Creek Police Department. “This is for the safety of our citizens and those using our roadways.”

The equipment includes cameras and vehicle sensors that are capable of calculating the speed a vehicle is moving. If a driver is speeding through an area where the equipment is located, a high resolution color photo will be taken of the vehicle’s license plate and number – similar to the red light camera at M-291 and Cement City Road.

A speeding ticket will then be sent to the vehicle’s owner. Soule said included with the ticket will be an affidavit. If the owner was not driving the vehicle at the time the infraction occurred, they can provide the name of who was driving and the city will send the speeding ticket to whomever is responsible.

The speed sensors will be placed in school zones and cross walks as well as in other areas of the city where speeding is a problem, such as along M-291, or in areas where complaints are made.

“We know that the safety of our children is near and dear to our hearts,” he said. “We receive complaints from citizens all the time about speeding, but we do not have the ability to place an officer in one section of the city for hours monitoring speed. This will give us the ability to respond to citizens complaints and concerns and address the problem.”

Because the equipment is portable, it can be moved to different places depending on the need. At night, it will be moved to an inside location to prevent damage. A sign will also be posted at least 300 feet from the sensors warning drivers that the area is being monitored by an Automated Traffic Enforcement System.

Concerns were raised that much like the red light cameras, litigation will be brought against equipment such as the speed sensors. Soule said because other states have upheld the use of red light cameras, he does not anticipate any problems with the use of the equipment.