Compared to periods of relative calm and comfort in our past 60 years, the last couple of years have been rather scary in the realm of finance and economics.

Compared to periods of relative calm and comfort in our past 60 years, the last couple of years have been rather scary in the realm of finance and economics.

People in high places in our national government, regardless of party affiliation, should have known their history better. They should have known better than to have allowed this giant credit bubble that has been building for decades, not just the past few years.

But my purpose today is not to chew the cud of blame and woe and put it on this page. Rather it is to give thanks that our situation has not gotten so bad that we have 25 percent unemployment and no hope of any effective solutions.

We can (and I believe should) argue civilly about what are the best methods to remedy the problems caused by our oceans of national debt and credit, but by and large, there is not only a chicken in every pot, but lots of beef to go around if you prefer it to the traditional turkey.

We have some homeless people who made the free choice to give up their homes through foreclosure rather than give up their cell phones and cut expenses elsewhere. That is not what I would do, but until now at least, each person can make his own choice according to his priorities, not someone else’s.

Last week I heard a presentation by a volunteer with The Harvesters about its food supply programs. Not only do we feed our school children weekday breakfast and lunch but we send them home for the weekend with backpacks full of food. We with extra resources are free to give our money and have it stretched incredibly well by organizations like that.

With or without a new enactment from Congress, if I had no expensive health insurance I would still be treated at any hospital if I had a true emergency. From what health-care workers tell me, I would most likely be treated whether it was an emergency or not.

We still have the right to vote for our representatives. We also have the right not to vote, and the majority of people sometimes make that choice. In our states in the Midwest, we have the right to expect that there will not be much voting fraud. During my recent trip to California, I learned that some judge or judges have taken away that right from its citizens and it is against the rules to require any voter to prove his or her identity before voting.

During this month several hundred thousand hunters took to the woods and peaceably tried to help us avoid more auto accidents with deer. There were a few accidents, I am sure, but I am glad that I have the right to engage in that sport even if I rarely do.

You get the picture. Even though it may seem that I rant and rave about political economics and financial problems quite a bit, I am thankful that here in these United States, we have more of a fix-it mentality than anywhere else in the world. We are unwilling to simply accept a bad situation as the way it has to be. Above all, I am thankful to God for His blessings of so much liberty and abundance. To whom are you thankful?