City Administrator Gary Bradley presented the Board of Aldermen with four options of moving forward Monday. The board could accept one of the five bids received for citywide  trash service, reject the bids, form a task force of elected officials to look into the idea more or form a task force of elected officials and citizens to look into it.

The prospect of citywide trash service has not been widely welcomed in Grain Valley.

City Administrator Gary Bradley presented the Board of Aldermen with four options of moving forward Monday. The board could accept one of the five bids received, reject the bids, form a task force of elected officials to look into the idea more or form a task force of elected officials and citizens to look into it.

The board opted to form a task force of elected officials and citizens.

“I think there’s just a sense that a staff review isn’t enough,” Bradley said.

A few aldermen, like Terry Beebe, thought the existing trash collection practice is working fine – citizens select the provider and are billed directly.

“I don’t think the city has been listening to the citizens,” Beebe said. “I think we should leave this as it is, put it down and move on.”

At the very least Beebe said the citizens should have the chance to vote on what they want. Alderman Mike Todd agreed that maybe an election (during the April municipal election) would be a good idea.

“If we’re locked in (to a contract) for two years, and I have an issue, what recourse do I have?” Todd questioned.

Bradley said Todd’s concerns were valid and compared the idea of citywide trash service to being locked into a certain cable or phone provider.

The city received bids from AAA, Envirostar, Deffenbaugh, Briggs Disposal and Town & Country.

Bradley’s recommendation to the board, should they opt for a citywide provider, would be AAA Disposal.

However, Kim Roam, a local attorney representing Envirostar, expressed concerns that such a contract would push a local business out of town.

“They want to continue serving the customer base they have,” Roam said. “When they made their bid proposal, they understood there would be some dialogue with the city.”

Roam said Envirostar is flexible and willing to negotiate.

Bradley said, in his mind, the program would be set up so there would be multiple providers in the city who are responsible for different parts of the town.

The specifics of how a citywide provider would work would still need to be ironed out. Bradley said the citizens could either be billed directly by a provider, or the city could enter into a contract with the provider and bill the citizens (like it does with water and sewer bills now).

The city will form a task force to get more citizen input and bring a proposal back to the board.