Our General Assembly has a full plate of important issues this session. How to operate state government for free seems to be a major objective. In the search for answers, looking over our neighbors’ shoulder seems permissible. Imitation is a sincere form of flattery, or so we’re told.

To the editor:

Our General Assembly has a full plate of important issues this session. How to operate state government for free seems to be a major objective. In the search for answers, looking over our neighbors’ shoulder seems permissible. Imitation is a sincere form of flattery, or so we’re told.

The powers that be in Kansas have decided cutting all business and some individual tax is the road to prosperity. Our own Republican hole-in-the-wall gang professes we must follow suit or face economic Armageddon. Early indications are that Kansas may have trouble getting the effects of this plan wiped off their boots.

Two Nebraska state senators have introduced a bill to eliminate the individual income tax and the corporate tax and make up the lost revenue by eliminating sales tax exemptions. Currently, agriculture machinery and crop inputs, including seed, chemicals and fertilizer, are exempt from the Nebraska sales tax. Nebraska and Missouri have much in common. Both have large rural areas, both have a conservative populace, both have similar tax laws and both are ruled by Republicans.

How could the evidence be clearer? Corporate interests have out bid farmers for political affection.

Why didn’t our Republicans think of this keen idea? Call your legislator and tell him to copy a page out of the Nebraska play book. On second thought, save your dime; they’ll get around to it soon enough. If it’s good enough for the neighbors, it’s good enough for us.