Although fresh snow fell Wednesday morning, Independence Public Works crews had cleared more than half of the city’s residential streets in time for the evening rush hour.

Although fresh snow fell Wednesday morning, Independence Public Works crews had cleared more than half of the city’s residential streets in time for the evening rush hour.

Public Works Director John Powell said about 60 percent of residential streets were cleared by 4 p.m. Wednesday. Crews worked to remove new snow from first-priority streets during the Wednesday morning rush-hour before spending a bulk of the day on residential areas, Powell said.

“We’re going to work (Wednesday) evening and through the night and on Thursday,” he said. “We may have to do some retreating if the melted snow refreezes throughout the night, but we are into the residential areas.”

The city also has started snow removal on cul-de-sacs and dead-end streets. Independence includes between 300 to 400 cul-de-sacs in its street inventory, and the city said those usually take the most time in snow removal.

“You have to go back and forth several times to get them opened up because of the pavement there,” Powell said. “That will be taking some time as we finish this up.”

Residents who are concerned about snow removal in their neighborhoods should contact the main Public Works office or the Street Maintenance Division, both of which are available through the city’s main telephone number at 816-325-7000.

Callers are encouraged to call just once. The calls are recorded, and citizens won’t receive a call back.

Powell also suggested citizens submit a request on the city’s website (www.indepmo.org) through the Action Center. He said residents should continue to avoid parking in the streets, if possible, to aid in the cleanup efforts.

“That will help us,” he said, “especially now that we’re working in the residential areas. The fewer cars that are parked in the streets, the better they are going to get cleaned.”

Three out of 22 of the city’s snow removal trucks are currently broken, but Powell said that hasn’t affected removal efforts too much.

“Now that we have the main streets opened, it’s just a matter of how quickly we can go through the residential streets,” he said. “We certainly want to hear from (residents on Thursday) if they are seeing something that needs to get done.”