|
|
Examiner
  • Bill Althaus: Reid's arrival brings needed hope to Chiefs

  • As I write this column Friday afternoon, I have a sneaking suspicion that season ticket letters are being typed, proofed and sent from Arrowhead Stadium to Kansas City Chiefs fans letting them know that in order to make this year’s team better, it’s going to take a hike in season ticket prices.

    • email print
  • As I write this column Friday afternoon, I have a sneaking suspicion that season ticket letters are being typed, proofed and sent from Arrowhead Stadium to Kansas City Chiefs fans letting them know that in order to make this year’s team better, it’s going to take a hike in season ticket prices.
    And in their joyful glee at the news of Andy Reid coming in as coach and general manager Scott Pioli leaving, fans will enthusiastically dig deep into their pockets and shell out whatever chairman of the board Clark Hunt wants.
    I hope I’m wrong, but I can’t see any NFL franchise passing up the chance to fill its coffers.
    Following a dismal 2-14 season, the Chiefs should be paying the fans to come watch a team that was so embarrassing that it sent five players to the Pro Bowl and still managed to come up with the No. 1 pick in the collegiate draft.
    And speaking of that draft pick, it comes in a year where that pick offers no rock-solid choice.
    Last year, the Chiefs could have selected Andrew Luck, the most prolific rookie passer in NFL history, or Robert Griffin III, who led the Washington Redskins from the crypt to the playoffs.
    This year, a team that desperately needs a quarterback - and so many other skill players - has no go-to guy to select. Luck and Griffin have breathed new life into their respective franchises.
    The Chiefs need that type of player, and I believe the only way they can get him is through a trade.
    But who would trade a player who can step in and fill an immediate opening for the Chiefs in a year when the No. 1 pick is about as meaningless as being the captain of the Titanic? It’s a great title, but you know it’s not going to play out well.
    It has been reported that Reid has come to terms with the Chiefs now that Pioli and his ego are out of the picture.
    Reid controlled football operations during his 14-year stay in Philadelphia and it appears that a front-runner for the Chiefs GM position is Tom Heckert, who worked with Reid in Philly and who was recently fired by the Cleveland Browns.
    Hunt took the high road in discussing Pioli’s departure.
    “After several productive conversations, we made the difficult decision to part ways with Scott Pioli and allow him to pursue other opportunities,” Hunt said. “Scott has been an invaluable member of the Chiefs family since joining us in 2009, and we sincerely appreciate his tremendous contributions over the last four years. He has a great deal of appreciation for the history of this franchise, for our players, coaches and employees, and especially our great fans.”
    Page 2 of 2 - If that is true, he certainly never showed it in public.
    Pioli seemed to have a disdain for the fans and the rich history of this team.
    The Chiefs did nothing to embrace former players. One Chiefs Ring of Honor member told me that Pioli would not allow the Chiefs alumni group to meet at the Truman Sports Complex.
    When I attempted to find out more on that scenario, Pioli would not respond to an interview request.
    The secretive way he ran his team made me think his skill set was better suited to the CIA than the NFL.
    Pioli, 47, was named the Chiefs general manager on Jan. 13, 2009. During his stint his team finished with a 23-42 overall record and earned one playoff appearance.
    During the time Reid has been at the helm of the Eagles, the Chiefs have had five coaches and become an NFL doormat in a league where revenue sharing creates an even playing field.
    I’m not going to kick a guy when he’s down, but come on, how can you field a team as bad as the 2012 Chiefs?
    “The bottom line is that I did not accomplish all of what I set out to do,” Pioli said in a statement. “To the Hunt family – to the great fans of the Kansas City Chiefs – to the players, all employees and alumni, I truly apologize for not getting the job done.”
    Like Marty Schottenheimer, a coach who was never truly appreciated by most fans because he never led the Chiefs to the Super Bowl, Reid has the “can’t win the big game” tag, even though his Eagles made a losing Super Bowl appearance during his time on the sidelines.
    But he is a winner, and right now, this franchise desperately needs a winner at the helm.
    I can only hope that this is just the first move in one of many that will once against make Sunday afternoons something Chiefs fans can savor.
     
      • calendar