The following items were taken from the Nov. 21 through 27, 1959,  and Nov. 21-27, 1909, Examiner

The following items were taken from the Nov. 21 through 27, 1959, Examiner.



Nearly 400 persons attended the annual dinner of the Wagon Wheel District at which Boy Scout leaders were honored for their work. The Order of the Silver Beaver was awarded to Lester L. Fike, Ben V. Alton and W. Morris Turner. A new award, Order of Merit, was presented to Ed Mader, Dr. W.J. Lee, James Pimblott, H. Tupper Smith and Paul D. Arend.

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The new John W. Luff elementary school was officially dedicated Nov. 22. The Board of Education voted to name the new building for Mr. Luff, who served on the board from 1931 to 1949, when he retired. From 1936 until his retirement, he was president of the Board. He died Sept. 25, 1958.

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A native Jackson Countian, Walker Cooper, of Buckner, has been hired for the coaching staff of the Kansas City Athletics (A’s). Cooper, the catcher in the famous Cooper brothers team, managed the Indianapolis Indians during the 1958-1959 season. Cooper played in the National League for 17 years. He was in the World Series three years, all while playing with the St. Louis Cardinals, and played in all six all-star games.

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Abigail Van Buren, known to millions of readers as “Dear Abby,” is the fascinating columnist you’ve read about in Time, Coronet, Pageant, Life and other magazines. Starting Nov. 30 in The Examiner, you’ll have the opportunity to read her sparkling, pithy and sage advice to the troubled people who write her.
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The following items were taken from the Nov. 21 through 27, 1909, Examiner.

Louis B. Root, superintendent of Mount Washington Cemetery, died at St. Mary’s hospital in Kansas City. He was superintendent of Mount Washington since 1901. He was superintendent of parks under the first park board in 1893. Later he made a survey of Swope Park and in the following year became its first superintendent. During his term, he carried out plans for the early development of the park.

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William F. Street has purchased the two story brick building at 209 W. Lexington Street. The consideration was $6,000. He purchased the building from G.B. McCauley. The ground floor is occupied by the Lyric theater, and the second story comprises the east half of the Eagle hall.

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After one or two postponements, the “possum” hunt for city councilmen and other officers and a few friends will take place. Nothing less than a blizzard or an earthquake is to prevent it, according to councilman W.L. Jones the author of the scheme. It is to be on the farm of A.J. Bundschu, near Little Blue, east of Salem church. The party will go in automobiles.

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William G. Gore of Blue Springs received one of the petitions asking that state wide prohibition be voted upon in the general election in 1910. He told Judge Wallace at the time that he doubted if he could fill such a petition at Blue Springs because it was a wet town. Gore circulated the petition and in 24 hours had it filled and sent for more. Out of the 172 men he presented the petition to, 162 signed.