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Examiner
  • Making a Difference: Residents of Villages of Jackson Creek giving back

  • For the residents at the Villages of Jackson Creek Assisted Living, giving back to the community is a way to show appreciation for the help they have received throughout their lives.

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  • For the residents at the Villages of Jackson Creek Assisted Living, giving back to the community is a way to show appreciation for the help they have received throughout their lives.
    “I was born and raised in Kansas City and remember going to the food pantry once a month for a supply of dried food and dried eggs,” said Shirley Young. “I feel like this is payback time because there are still hungry people out there.”
    Residents of the Eastern Jackson County assisted living center are collecting monetary donations that will be used to purchase food for the Salvation Army’s food pantry. They are shopping for the items through Sept. 11, which has been dubbed the National Day of Service and Remembrance. The day was created in 2002 by nonprofit group MyGoodDeed as a way to inspire service on Sept. 11 as well as to pay tribute to those men and women who rose up to volunteer in response to the terrorist attacks on that day in 2001.
    “I think this is really a way to make something good out of something bad,” said Kathy Fenwick, life enrichment coordinator for Lifetime Wellness at the Villages of Jackson Creek. “We were taking about doing something for the community, and the residents thought this would be something really neat. I think it brings everyone together because they remember being in the era of the Great Depression when they did not have a lot.”
    Winnie Schwab, Paulina Graef and Young are among a small group of residents coordinating the collection drive. Anyone in the community interested in making a donation should contact Fenwick at 816-795-1433, ext. 2020.
    Why did you want to organize a collection drive to restock the pantry shelves at the Salvation Army?
    Young: I was 75 years old the day that happened, and I feel like this is a good way to remember the many people that we lost on that day. There are also always hungry people, and we should do what we can to help.
    Graef: We saw an article in the newspaper about the Salvation Army needing more food. More families came in than they were expecting and no one should be turned away.
    Schwab: I think we should always do something for someone else rather than thinking of just ourselves.
    How are the residents responding to the collection drive?
    Young: I think they are responding very well. A lot of people lived through World War II and the Great Depression, so they can identify with it.
    Graef: I hope they respond well because there is certainly a need. When you see food pantries asking for food, you know it must be bad. If they don’t have enough, how can they help the people who need it? This is what we can do to help.
    Page 2 of 2 - Schwab: People around here went through the Great Depression, so they know what this is all about. I think he reception is going to be real good.
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