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Examiner
  • Stephen Brown: 'Save Our Chiefs' movement takes off

  • The "Save Our Chiefs" crusade is growing by leaps and bounds. Already, SOC has nearly 105,000 followers on Twitter, that's nearly as many as the Kansas City Chiefs. For those who don't dabble on Twitter, it's a big deal. If SOC were a politician they'd be gaining votes by the droves.

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  • The "Save Our Chiefs" crusade is growing by leaps and bounds. Already, SOC has nearly 105,000 followers on Twitter, that's nearly as many as the Kansas City Chiefs. For those who don't dabble on Twitter, it's a big deal. If SOC were a politician they'd be gaining votes by the droves.
    "Believe it or not, we have current and past players supporting our movement," said a promoter of SOC. "Many of them are unhappy with this direction, too. Don't believe me? Then you are not watching the games."
    Having current and former players back SOC is a huge boast. If true, it would be hard for Clark Hunt to ignore.
    "Members of SOC are not waving their fingers at people who choose to wear red on Nov. 18," creator of SOC Marty McDonald told Chief Concerns. "We simply choose to wear black Chiefs gear, which the club sells. The ‘Graveyard of Death’ quote was used to as a jarring bolt to wake people up. I appreciate fans wanting change as we do, and that's great. That's the common bond that needs to occur. It is troubling to me and others that because we are choosing to wear black Chiefs gear (which the team sells), we are being ostracized by a select few as not true fans. That's where the division is occurring. It's not ‘us’ causing this division with sensationalized statements."
    McDonald says he has the airfare bills, hotel bills, car rental tabs, food, and etc. to prove his fandom. McDonald has been a diehard fan flying back to Kansas City ever since 1989 when he moved to Arizona.
    Wearing black to the Bengals game is supposed to be a one-time deal, but it's just not black NFL Chiefs jerseys like McDonald explained. Sports Nutz, a family-owned business in Independence, is helping McDonald spread the merchandise specifically created for the Bengals game. According to Sports Nutz owner John Kilmer, his phone for the apparel has been ringing nonstop.
    "We are lifelong Chiefs fans and have been season-ticket holders since 1988," Kilmer said. "The lack of success by the Chiefs has highly impacted our business over the years."
    Sports Nutz official stance is they want accountability from the organization and changes to restore the Chiefs back to success.
    "We look forward to the day that Arrowhead, once again, is known as the loudest and best stadium in the NFL. ... We're a part of Chiefs Nation and support all different opinions. We want to thank all Chiefs fans and customers we have supported through the years."
    John Kilmer emphasize that Sports Nutz is not the one to start this movement. He simply agreed to partner with the campaign for change and be the outlet for the sale of the special Save Our Chiefs apparel. The revenue generated by Sports Nutz is supporting the campaign.
    Page 2 of 2 - It's a very touchy topic because not all fans agree with SOC. Fans are tearing each other up over this cause. By now, Scott Pioli knows all about it. It's growing at an unprecedented speed and benching Matt Cassel has done little to calm fans. SOC isn't stopping and are even planning to hand out flyers at the Oakland Raider game to promote the "Blackout Arrowhead" day. If SOC's Twitter account continues to swell, it'll be a big issue for Chiefs' owner Clark Hunt.
    "We realize there are differing views on how to bring about change," Kilmer said. "We also realize that some fans will view this in a negative manner. However, with over 100,000 fans already on board with this movement, one thing is obvious: We all want change."
    THE HUMAN FACTOR: There's no way around the big elephant in the room. With SOC, the tension of the Chiefs being 1-5 and fans upset over Pioli not spilling the beans enough on change, it's a tough environment, especially on the players.
    Players are caught in the middle. Talking to rookie Nate Eachus, he almost pleaded for fan support this Sunday against the Oakland Raiders.
    "Sometimes it's tough with the way the season is going,” Eachus said. “We hear the boos early on, but we need support. At the end of the day, we are human beings, so when we hear that positive feedback, we feed off that stuff. We hear that positive energy from the crowd; I mean that's our home crowd. Hopefully we can jump on them early and it'll be all good from there."
    Chiefs kicker Ryan Succop keeps adversity in perspective by leaning on his faith.
    "When I think about how we live our lives as human beings, and even as Christians,” Succop said, “I think a lot of the times, we put our hope in things that are false. We believe in things that aren't true. I don't stand here and preach perfection because I got plenty of things in my life that I want to work on, that I battle. At the end of the day, God's grace is sufficient."
     The Raiders have won five straight at Arrowhead and the last six out of 10 against the Chiefs. It's time for some positive traction. A win against the Raiders won't change the standing much, but  it’d be a good start.
    Good day, Chiefs fans!
     

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