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Examiner
  • Lasater wins 53rd as he predicted

  • Brent Lasater, the Republican candidate for 53rd District State Representative, predicted he would win by 1,000 votes.

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  • Brent Lasater, the Republican candidate for 53rd District State Representative, predicted he would win by 1,000 votes.
    What a prediction.
    Lasater won by 1,074 votes.
    He defeated Democratic candidate Diane Egger, earning 5,284 votes (55.15 percent) to Egger’s 4,210 (43.94 percent). Eighty-seven write-in votes were counted. A total of 9,581 votes were cast in the district’s 21 precincts, according to the Jackson County Election Board.
    “I had a real good feeling going in,” Lasater told The Examiner by phone late Tuesday. “And I was right.”
    A woman was heard shouting with joy in the background, saying “all on a $500 budget.”
    Egger raised more than $30,000 during the campaign. Lasater reported “limited activity” with the Missouri Ethics Commission. That means he spent no more than $500 on the campaign. “I was frugal with money,” he said.
    Republican candidates dominated races across America and in several key races in Missouri. Lasater said that helped him.
    “I think it was a referendum on the job that is being done in D.C. right now,” Lasater said. “It kind of surprised me that it hit so local on me, but I’m happy it did. It gives me a shot to, you know, prove myself to the public.”
    Lasater said the Republican Party needs to learn from recent defeats and move forward.
    “I’d like for the attitudes being changed in my own party. I think they’ve been taught a lesson in the last couple of elections. I think they need to learn from this and they need to get back to community service.”
    Lasater ran for the seat most recently in 2008 and lost to the current 53rd representative, Curt Dougherty, a Democrat who cannot run because of term limits.
    Lasater said he based his prediction on numbers based on his primary victory.
    The 50-year-old Independence man has been a truck driver for 28 years. The job will not interfere with his new job as a state representative.
    “It’s flexible,” he said. “I’m not going to neglect the district. It comes first. Now it’s up to me to say what I’ve told everyone: That I’m all about the community, and I’m here for them.”

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