|
|
Examiner
  • Bariatric lap band: A better weight loss surgery

  • With more than 75 million Americans falling into the obese category and more than half of that group considered type 2 diabetics by the Centers for Disease Control, it's little wonder that bariatric surgery is growing as a means for dealing with this growing health concern.

    • email print
  • With more than 75 million Americans falling into the obese category and more than half of that group considered type 2 diabetics by the Centers for Disease Control, it's little wonder that bariatric surgery is growing as a means for dealing with this growing health concern.
    Once considered an extreme and somewhat dangerous measure, doctors are increasingly looking to bariatric procedures when diet and exercise fail to keep their patients weight within healthy limits.
    Bariatric surgery is a proven weight loss method for those with a high risk factor for health issues as measured by their body mass index (BMI). The BMI is a ratio of your weight to height.
    The ideal BMI ranges from 18.5 to 24.9.
    If your BMI is between 25 and 29.9, you are thought to be overweight.
    If it is between 30 and 34.9, you are considered obese.
    If it is between 35 and 39.9, you are severely obese.
    If your BMI is 40 or more, you are said to be morbidly obese.
    Apart from diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease and stroke, obesity puts a big strain on virtually every system in your body. Even some form of cancers can be triggered by obesity.
    The current surgical options available to such patients include:
    Laparoscopic Adjustable Gastric Banding (LAGB) -- a restrictive, adjustable and reversible procedure because it involves no re-routing or removal of the intestines, allowing the stomach to feel full with much less food.
    Gastric Bypass (Roux-en-Y or RYGB)--also a restrictive operation. This means the stomach is restricted by being stapled to make a smaller pouch for food. The result is that you cannot eat as much, but the changes in your stomach and intestine are difficult to reverse.
    Sleeve Gastrectomy--also a restrictive procedure where part of the stomach is stapled and the lower part is removed. These changes to the stomach are permanent.
    There are several considerations when choosing a weight loss surgery method. Gastric bypass and Sleeve gastrectomy procedures both tend to show higher weight loss percentages in patients over the course of time, but they also have much higher complication rates than adjustable gastric banding which can include pulmonary embolus (blockage in the artery of the lung), stenosis (narrowing of a blood vessel), leakage, hernia, ulcers, bowel obstructions, and dumping syndrome, whereingested foods bypass the stomach too rapidly and enter the small intestine largely undigested.
    For these and other reasons, we've concluded that the adjustable lap band approach - and in particular, the LAP-BANDSystem is the best bariatric surgical approach to getting our patients where they want to be.
    First, In recent studies, more than 50 percent of patients lost more than 50 percent excess weight at two years, with an average of 53 percent. On average, these LAP-BANDpatients had more than 64 percent excess weight loss at 48 months.
    Page 2 of 2 - Obese people with type 2 diabetes often report significant improvement in diabetes with weight loss.
    The excess weight loss delivered by the LAP-BANDSystem may resolve other health issues, such as infertility, disabilities caused by joint disease, obesity-related depression, and Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), which is often referred to as severe heartburn.
    The LAP-BANDSystem is not right for everyone. You and your surgeon should work together to decide whether it is the right treatment for you. Here are some of the things your surgeon will consider.
    Your BMI. It must be 40 or greater if you have no obesity-related problems.
    If you are 30 pounds overweight and have an obesity-related condition such as diabetes, your BMI can be 30 or greater.
    If you are at least 18 years old.
    If you are prepared to attend regular follow-up sessions and make lifestyle changes including diet and exercise.
    For more information on the LAP-BANDSystem, or to view an educational seminar, visit bariatrickc.com or attend a live presentation at St. Marys Medical Center. The next seminar is Thursday, June 27, 6 p.m. To reserve a seat for the seminar call the St. Marys Bariatric Navigator at 816-655-5560.
    Dr. Adam Kramer, D.O., practices at St. Mary's Medical Center in Blue Springs.
     
     
      • calendar