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Examiner
  • Our Opinion: The people voted, so live with it

  • When the voters speak on policy issues, elected leaders need to respect that.

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  • When the voters speak on policy issues, elected leaders need to respect that.
    That’s why Missouri leaders need to drop talk of reversing last week’s vote on Proposition B, which finally puts some meaningful anti-cruelty rules into effect and cracks down some on the puppy mills that have been a disgrace to this state for years. Among other things, dogs will now have to have drinking water free of algae and feces, will have to have a living space at least big enough to turn around in, and will live in cages with solid floors instead of wire floors so the wastes from dogs in cages stacked above them won’t flow down onto them.
    Opponents of the measure tried very hard to distort things before the election, reading into it an anti-animal-ownership agenda that goes way beyond dogs. In other words, we weren’t really voting on what we were voting on. Voters didn’t buy it.
    Here we go again. Since voters in 103 of the state’s 114 counties voted no, opponents imply, the election doesn’t really reflect the will of the people. Unless we willing to say a vote in Jasper County or Johnson County is worth more than one in Jackson County, that argument is absurd. Yes, the bigger counties leaned toward Prop B, and the rural counties didn’t. This is hardly the first or last election to split along those lines. One person, one vote is still the rule. Don’t let anyone water that down with slippery logic and deceitful language.
    Did Prop B require a simple majority to pass? Yes. Did it pass? Yes. The vote was 995,423 to 934,591. Every eligible voter in the state had a chance to have a say. The vote was fairly close – 51.6 percent to 48.4 percent – but the people have spoken. This would never have gone to the ballot at all if state legislators at some point could have bestirred themselves to enact at least some of these reforms, but, as with other issues, they took a pass. They’ve had their chances. It’s a little late now to suddenly show concern because an election went the wrong way.
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