Pity the poor citizens of Iowa, who are being bombarded with broadcast and print ads from Republican presidential candidates. The beat goes on until the Iowa caucuses on Jan. 3. Iowa merchants are still struggling to find space and time to sell their after-Christmas wares.

Pity the poor citizens of Iowa, who are being bombarded with broadcast and print ads from Republican presidential candidates. The beat goes on until the Iowa caucuses on Jan. 3. Iowa merchants are still struggling to find space and time to sell their after-Christmas wares.

Then there are those pollsters calling at dinnertime. Will it ever end?

Polls should be objective and informative, but how can that be when Ed Schultz of MSNBC or Fox’s “Fox and Friends” ask their partisan audience questionable questions with predictable results.

Gallup, Rasmussen, TV networks, large daily newspaper dailies, bloggers and even local hometown media conduct polls.

The Des Moines Register recently polled 401 likely caucusgoers and found that former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich received 25 percent while Congressman Ron Paul came in second with 18 percent. Even though only 401 Iowans were polled, experts say they do not need huge numbers to predict results.

Conversely the Rasmussen poll had former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney ahead with 25 percent followed by Paul at 20 percent and Gingrich at 17 percent.

The Washington Post-ABC News poll looked only at independent Republicans and reports that Gingrich and Romney are each tied at 30 percent.

Are you confused yet, Iowans?

In a hypothetical election, Rasmussen results predicted Obama bests Gingrich 48 to 39 percent. Most other polls have the president winning over all of the GOP presidential candidates.

“Pollsters find it difficult to get people to talk to them,” writes Roger Simons of Politico. “ ... Pollsters call us during inconvenient times when they expect us to be home (the dinner hour, for example) and then can ask all sorts of personal questions about our age, sex, religion, party affiliation, income and whom we intend to vote for.”

The floodwaters of political ads and polling are also rising in New Hampshire, Nevada and South Carolina, which are up next in the Republican primary process.

When the Missouri Republican caucus rolls around on March 17 the candidate may already be selected, rendering Missouri’s decision irrelevant.

Most pollsters agree that all of the above is subject to change and to treat all polls with a grain of salt. However, which salt? There are six varieties. So now we’ll need a salt poll.

I give you President John Adams’ toast: Independence forever.