A Boy Scout wrote a letter in The Examiner (“Whatever happened to cursive in schools,” Dec. 22)  in support of cursive writing. Too bad some educators fail to appreciate the value of cursive writing.

Dear editor:

A Boy Scout wrote a letter in The Examiner (“Whatever happened to cursive in schools,” Dec. 22)  in support of cursive writing. Too bad some educators fail to appreciate the value of cursive writing.

If cursive writing is dropped now, then who in the future will be able to read letters from Santa (the real one – the one who writes in cursive). Who will be able to read the handwritten letters and notes shown in close-ups in old classic movies? Who will be able to read forwarded “greeting cards” designed by someone who uses digital cursive fonts? Who will be able to read the original Declaration of Independence and other historical documents? And who will be able to read notes written by those who write in cursive, if they appear to them only as some mysterious code? And who will be able to read or teach cursive writing in the future if future teachers – who are pupils now – are cursively illiterate?

Good cursive writing helps train eye-hand coordination for motor skills and exercises concentration and focus. If cursive writing is dropped and future Americans can only write block letters or tweet, how will that affect America’s ability to compete globally while other nations still teach cursive writing and derive its related cognitive benefits?

Perhaps a contest for cursive writing with cash prizes for kids could help promote interest in preserving this skill if schools choose to neglect it.