On Sunday Lone Jack Historical Society volunteers will place 270 flickering points of light to fill the Civil War Battlefield Cemetery grounds, 301 S. Bynum Road in Lone Jack.

On Sunday Lone Jack Historical Society volunteers will place 270 flickering points of light to fill the Civil War Battlefield Cemetery grounds, 301 S. Bynum Road in Lone Jack. From dusk to 10:30 p.m., visitors may walk among the luminaries, one candle for each casualty, Union and Confederate, in the battle that took place on Aug. 16, 1862.

At 9 p.m. there will be a reading of the names of the known casualties from the battle, followed by the playing of taps on the bugle. Silent sentries provided by Civil War living history groups will guard the entrances to the park and patrol the grounds during the evening vigil. This event honors the memory of those soldiers who fell that day in this battle on the bloody border in America’s history. This Memorial Illumination at the Lone Jack Battlefield and Cemetery falls on the 142nd anniversary of the first widely observed Decoration Day for Civil War soldiers. U. S. Gen. John Logan declared in General Order No. 11 that: “The 30th of May, 1868, is designated for the purpose of strewing with flowers, or otherwise decorating the graves of comrades who died in defense of their country during the late rebellion, and whose bodies now lie in almost every city, village, and hamlet churchyard in the land. In this observance no form of ceremony is prescribed, but posts and comrades will in their own way arrange such fitting services and testimonials of respect as circumstances may permit.”

The Border conflict and the battle at Lone Jack have been gaining greater respect among historians for their significance to the overall history of the war. Newspaper reports of the Battle of Lone Jack in 1862 reached as far east as New York City. No wonder, as a participant recalled it as, “The bloodiest battle fought west of the Mississippi.” A 10th the size of the battle at Antietam, the Lone Jack battle consequences and preservation plight have taken almost a century and a half to become fully realized.