How do you fund very important operations, like the public schools, fire department and police department, when they all need more than they receive?

To the editor:

How do you fund very important operations, like the public schools, fire department and police department, when they all need more than they receive? We have seen the great work of our fire department when a home is destroyed and the family was miraculously saved; we have all applauded the work of the police when facing great danger to themselves and others. We can’t live without our police and fire employees. They have rightly pushed the community to increase income for wages and equipment.

While not at all downplaying their contribution to society, I want to mention a segment of our population that sits at the lower end of the salary scale, but interfaces much more with the citizens of our community. Counting summer school, teachers have our children more than 200 days a year. It usually isn’t very dramatic, and today they have many different hats to wear. They must step in often and serve as parent, counselor, sometimes even as policeman, mediator, nutrition adviser (so many children don’t get food at home), doctor (some aren’t provided basic health care at home), encourager – and also teach these children for them to be prepared to make a contribution to society.

Today we are faced with declining revenues and we see or hear very little about the financial needs of our teachers. They are not nearly as well paid as some of the other public servants but work just as hard and serve under just as much stress as other public servants. I would hate to see our current financial situation get down to who can influence and lobby the best with our elected officials.

As one who has seen firsthand this past year how they daily face the challenges before them, please consider them also, maybe even first, when funds are allocated.