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Examiner
The Rev. Tim Schenck, rector of St. John the Evangelist in Hingham, Mass., looks for God amid domestic chaos
In Tar and Paint and Stone
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About this blog
Tim Schenck is an Episcopal priest, husband to Bryna, father to Benedict and Zachary, and \x34master\x34 to Delilah (about 50 in dog years). Since 2009 I've been the rector of the Episcopal Parish of St. John the Evangelist in Hingham, Mass. (on the ...
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Father Tim
Tim Schenck is an Episcopal priest, husband to Bryna, father to Benedict and Zachary, and \x34master\x34 to Delilah (about 50 in dog years). Since 2009 I've been the rector of the Episcopal Parish of St. John the Evangelist in Hingham, Mass. (on the South Shore of Boston). I've also served parishes in Maryland and New York. When I'm not tending to my parish, hanging out with my family, or writing, I can usually be found drinking good coffee -- not that drinking coffee and these other activities are mutually exclusive. I hope you'll visit my website at www.frtim.com to find out more about me, read some excerpts from my book \x34What Size are God's Shoes: Kids, Chaos & the Spiritual Life\x34 (Morehouse, 2008), and check out some recent sermons.
Recent Posts
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March 8, 2013 12:01 a.m.



Ever since I read the Little House book series by Laura Ingalls Wilder, I have been fascinated by the pioneers-those who went west on the Oregon-California Trails. When we travel across Kansas, I picture the covered wagons going up and down the rises in the Flint Hills or straight across the flatness of other sections of Kansas.







If you have ancestors who went west, MGC has a resource that is not widely known. In Tar and Paint and Stone: The Inscriptions at Independence Rock and Devil’s Gate is an amazing book by Levida Hileman. Mrs. Hileman, whom I have met, is a researcher extraordinaire. She has photographed all of the "graffiti" on Independence Rock and Devil’s Gate in Wyoming. The names inscribed on the rocks have been photographed and researched.







Independence Rock was considered by many as the halfway point on the way to Oregon, and pioneers hoped to reach it by the Fourth of July-hence the name. The signers on the rock were soldiers, fur traders, mountain men, and travelers. The author spent years researching pioneer diaries, census information, and available vital statistics to provide information on as many signees as possible. This book is an invaluable source for possibly finding your ancestor’s name on a historic landmark!







Just a tiny bit of info on this blog author: "I worked for many years at the Oregon-California Trails Association and the National Frontier Trails Museum. So, you can see I am just a little obsessed with the trails! So, expect more blogs with resource suggestions on finding your pioneer ancestors." There will also be an in-depth class later this year!







Happy Trails!







Suzanne V.



Midwest Genealogy Center

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