How many times am I going to write about parents behaving badly at their own kidsí sporting events?


How many times is Kim Kardashian going to get married? We have no way of knowing, right? Ditto on the bad parents. The possibilities are endless.


My latest rant stems from last Saturdayís U10 soccer game between my younger sonís team and their local rivals. Tom warned me going in that it wasnít going to be pretty.


Hoo boy. He sure wasnít kidding.


Hereís what when down:


The game was heated. An opposing player may or may not have tripped a player on Tomís team, but the ref called a foul. And then the little opposing player said, ďAre you f***iní kidding me?Ē to the ref. The referee heard the remark and gave the young player a yellow card.


Then the opposing coach screamed in outrage because he disagreed with the ref that what his player said was offensive and inappropriate. He already had bullied the young refs into calling some other fouls his way.


So in my worldview, that coach should have at the least received a yellow card and at the most been ejected from the game. But no. Nothing. The other parents and I were dumbfounded.


In disgust, I wrote a letter to the league board. Hereís an excerpt:


ďHmmm. It doesnít take a rocket scientist to figure out why a young player on that team would feel entitled to express his displeasure with the refereeís call. Just look at the coach.


While I find any behavior of this sort abhorrent, itís especially disturbing given the context. Itís a recreational soccer game. These children are 9 and 10 years old. The stakes are non-existent. Seriously, itís not worth developing high blood pressure over whether a referee made a proper call.


Iím certain this is not the first complaint you have received about this particular coachís sideline behavior, and Iím just as certain it wonít be the last, unless the man receives some sort of anger-management training. I just feel so sorry for whomever he goes home to.Ē



I think the league needs to ask itself whether the coaching behavior exhibited today is how the league wants to present itself.


So far, Iíve heard nothing from any of the board members who received my letter. Itíll be a week tomorrow.


Hereís the problem, people. Adults watching their children playing team sports have lost all perspective. I grew up barely after Title IX took effect, so most girls I knew didnít play team sports before junior high or high school. Some boys did play Little League, but I donít remember their parents going ape over their kidsí freakish athletic ability, plastering their cars with sport clings with their kiddosí name and number on it, driving all over Hellís Half-Acre to watch them play whatever sport they played.


And that would mostly be because the parents were busy with other things in life and saw sports as a diversion and learning experience to keep kids busy until more important things came along Ė like school and jobs.


I really think the energy expended by people like that opposing coach could be channeled into making sure their kids learn what they need to learn in school, set some attainable life goals and work on becoming a human being who could make the world a better place.


But I think Iím in the minority.



How many times am I going to write about parents behaving badly at their own kidsí sporting events?

How many times is Kim Kardashian going to get married? We have no way of knowing, right? Ditto on the bad parents. The possibilities are endless.

My latest rant stems from last Saturdayís U10 soccer game between my younger sonís team and their local rivals. Tom warned me going in that it wasnít going to be pretty.

Hoo boy. He sure wasnít kidding.

Hereís what when down:

The game was heated. An opposing player may or may not have tripped a player on Tomís team, but the ref called a foul. And then the little opposing player said, ďAre you f***iní kidding me?Ē to the ref. The referee heard the remark and gave the young player a yellow card.

Then the opposing coach screamed in outrage because he disagreed with the ref that what his player said was offensive and inappropriate. He already had bullied the young refs into calling some other fouls his way.

So in my worldview, that coach should have at the least received a yellow card and at the most been ejected from the game. But no. Nothing. The other parents and I were dumbfounded.

In disgust, I wrote a letter to the league board. Hereís an excerpt:

ďHmmm. It doesnít take a rocket scientist to figure out why a young player on that team would feel entitled to express his displeasure with the refereeís call. Just look at the coach.

While I find any behavior of this sort abhorrent, itís especially disturbing given the context. Itís a recreational soccer game. These children are 9 and 10 years old. The stakes are non-existent. Seriously, itís not worth developing high blood pressure over whether a referee made a proper call.

Iím certain this is not the first complaint you have received about this particular coachís sideline behavior, and Iím just as certain it wonít be the last, unless the man receives some sort of anger-management training. I just feel so sorry for whomever he goes home to.Ē

I think the league needs to ask itself whether the coaching behavior exhibited today is how the league wants to present itself.

So far, Iíve heard nothing from any of the board members who received my letter. Itíll be a week tomorrow.

Hereís the problem, people. Adults watching their children playing team sports have lost all perspective. I grew up barely after Title IX took effect, so most girls I knew didnít play team sports before junior high or high school. Some boys did play Little League, but I donít remember their parents going ape over their kidsí freakish athletic ability, plastering their cars with sport clings with their kiddosí name and number on it, driving all over Hellís Half-Acre to watch them play whatever sport they played.

And that would mostly be because the parents were busy with other things in life and saw sports as a diversion and learning experience to keep kids busy until more important things came along Ė like school and jobs.

I really think the energy expended by people like that opposing coach could be channeled into making sure their kids learn what they need to learn in school, set some attainable life goals and work on becoming a human being who could make the world a better place.

But I think Iím in the minority.