|
|
Examiner
  • Two Truman sites close March 24

  • The effects of sequestration on the Harry S Truman National Historic Site are now known.



    Effective March 24, federal budget cuts will permanently close two of the site’s facilities and will force the Truman Home to close Sundays, Mondays and all federal holidays.

    • email print
  • The effects of sequestration on the Harry S Truman National Historic Site are now known.
    Effective March 24, federal budget cuts will permanently close two of the site’s facilities and will force the Truman Home to close Sundays, Mondays and all federal holidays.
    March 1 had marked the deadline for automatic fiscal reductions, but the Independence site receives specific orders from the National Park Service regional office in Omaha, Neb., which receives direction from the U.S. Department of the Interior.
    Locally, the cuts were anticipated since America’s 398 national parks were asked to cut their budgets by 5 percent. Larry Villalva, superintendent of the Truman National Historic Site, said the cuts are unprecedented in his 37-year career with National Park Service.
    “The entire parks staff is still in shock,” Villalva said Wednesday. “We were awaiting until the very final moment, at the 12th hour, that some kind of resolution was going to be found in Washington, and of course, it never came.”
    Sequester, an effort to narrow the federal budget deficit, involves automatic cuts to federal programs. The following cuts are scheduled to take place in Independence and Grandview:
    – The Truman Home, 219 N. Delaware St., now open seven days a week, will close on Sundays and Mondays. The Truman Home is now closed on three federal holidays (Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s Day), but with budget cuts, the home would close on all 10 federal holidays.
    – Traditionally open for tours from Memorial Day through Labor Day, the Truman Farm Home at 12301 Blue Ridge Blvd. in Grandview would completely shut down for visits.
    The farm home’s grounds would remain open, but without funding to hire seasonal staff, the historic site can no longer provide tours. The National Park Service acquired the farm home and the 10 acres of farmland in 1994.
    – Just one year after the Noland Home at 216 N. Delaware St. opened its doors to the public, the house across the street from the Truman Home, that once belonged to Harry Truman’s cousins, will close its doors. The house had received thousands of dollars in renovations and had briefly served as a “visitor holding station,” a place where Truman Home visitors could get out of the elements and use the restroom until their tour started.
    At this time, Villalva said he didn’t know whether the Truman Farm Home or the Noland Home would ever reopen their doors to the public.
    “I wish I could tell you that we had an expectation of that or at least some possible hint of a relief being on the horizon,” he said, “but that’s unfortunately not true.”
     
      • calendar