|
|
Examiner
  • Top 5: Library staff share favorite reads of 2012

  • Late Wednesday afternoon, The Examiner asked all Mid-Continent Public Library staff members to recommend their favorite read in 2012.


    Less than 48 hours later, more than 30 responses had poured in, making one Top 5 article into a series that’s sure to last well into December.

    • email print
  • Late Wednesday afternoon, The Examiner asked all Mid-Continent Public Library staff members to recommend their favorite read in 2012.
    Less than 48 hours later, more than 30 responses had poured in, making one Top 5 article into a series that’s sure to last well into December.
    Today looks at the most popular responses to date, as well as several of the earliest responses from MCPL staff. Look in upcoming editions of The Examiner for more favorite reads, and feel free to email your favorite read this year, as well as a sentence or two on what made it so special, to adrianne.deweese@examiner.net.
    1 “Gone Girl” by Gillian Flynn
    With a tag line of “Marriage can be a real killer,” Kansas City native Gillian Flynn’s New York Times best-selling suspense novel received praise and acclaim from three library staff members. Beth Miller, a technical processor for the Interlibrary Loan Division, called the book “a riveting mystery” with “an amazing plot twist.”
    “I could not predict the ending,” Miller said.
    Karen Piland, a library assistant at the Boardwalk Branch, also described “Gone Girl” as a story that kept her guessing until the end.
    Andie Paloutzian, assistant manager at the Claycomo Branch, said she normally doesn’t read from this genre, “but I am trying to spread my wings. Au revoir moody teen fiction, hello psychological thriller.”
    The book is set along the Mississippi River in Missouri, and Paloutzian described Flynn as an author who “has done her hometown proud.”
    “You think you know what happened,” Paloutzian said of “Gone Girl.” “You don’t. What a book. I could not put it down.”
    2 “The Fault in Our Stars” by John Green
    Another New York Times bestseller, Green’s critically acclaimed novel about two teenagers and cancer also received three nods from MCPL staff, including Abbey Ludlow, who called the book Green’s “best one yet.”
    “It takes a really fresh approach to this very tough subject by injecting humor in all the right places,” said Ludlow, a library assistant at the South Independence Branch. But, she warns, “You’ll need some tissues with this one.”
    Says Beth Atwater, branch manager for the Lee’s Summit Branch: “(It’s) a character-driven story that made me fall in love with characters who look at life in a completely different way.”
    Despite Hazel’s terminal diagnosis, she tries to make the best of her short life in meeting a boy – a cancer survivor himself, said Chelsea Arnett Fiola, a substitute library clerk at South Independence.
    “The two embark on a philosophical journey on the meaning of life and attempt to meet the author of their favorite book,” she said, “while at the same time experiencing what it is like to fall hopelessly in love.”
    Page 2 of 2 - 3 “Wonder” by R.J. Palacio
    Palacio’s debut novel tells the story of a 10-year-old boy with facial deformities who must endure the challenges of starting at a new school. Holly Tohlen, a library assistant at the Blue Springs South Branch, said “Wonder” allows readers to view the world from a different perspective.
    “This book is completely different from anything else I have read this year,” Tohlen said. “It’s a great, enlightening read.”
    Cassandra Gorman, a full-time clerk at the Blue Springs South Branch, said she also enjoyed the book for its storytelling abilities.
    “It describes the school year, but from Auggie’s and his friends’ and family’s point of view,” Gorman said. “You are able to see how its abnormalities not only affect Auggie but also everyone around him.”
    4 “Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking” by Susan Cain
    So, you like peace and quiet in a world that is go, go, go? That’s OK, as Cain, a self-proclaimed introvert, describes in this non-fiction book.
    “(Cain) describes the characteristics, tells about how introverts re-energize themselves and talks about how to ‘pretend’ to be an extrovert when needed,” said Susan Wray, MCPL’s assistant director of libraries. “Cain also talks about the rise and expectations of extroverts and introduces the reader to successful introverts. I loved this book enough (that) I bought a copy and have recommended it to a number of people. It opened my eyes about myself and why I think and feel the way I do at times.”
    5 “Let’s Pretend This Never Happened (A Mostly True Memoir)” by Jenny Lawson
    Lawson, also known as “The Bloggess,” says on her website that no one was more surprised than she when “Let’s Pretend This Never Happened” debuted at No. 1 on the New York Times bestseller list.
    Says Jennifer Reeder, MCPL benefits coordinator, of her favorite read in 2012: “(This was) the funniest book I have ever read. Any misfit who is not currently a fan of ‘The Bloggess’ and her hysterical and poignant blog will become one when they read this book.”
     
     
        • »  EVENTS CALENDAR