On Tuesday, the citizens of Buckner will vote in a special election on a bond issue for the waterworks and sewage system in the city.

On Tuesday, the citizens of Buckner will vote in a special election on a bond issue for the waterworks and sewage system in the city.
The citizens will decide whether the city will issue $6 million to acquire, construct, extend, and improve the combined waterworks and sewage system of the city.
The bond would not raise taxes.
Buckner Mayor Larry Neidel sees many benefits to the passage of the issue.
“There are no drawbacks,” he said. “The benefits are that we will be able to produce our own water and have control over our own water supply and not have to depend on Independence.”
For many years Buckner has purchased its water from Independence. In 1971, a valve was installed that connects Buckner’s distribution system to Independence and allows water to be sent to a master meter and then distributed throughout Buckner as needed.
Since 1971, Buckner’s population has increased from 1,695 to 2,784. Because of the growth, the distribution system can no longer provide the city with enough water to meet its current needs and will not be able to expand for future growth.
The result of a 2007 study commissioned by the Board of Aldermen showed the city should consider owning and maintaining its own water treatment and distribution plant.
From Neidel’s point of view, the residents of Buckner seem to be optimistic about the bond issue.
“I’m getting the feeling a majorityof people want it to pass,” he said.
If the issue passes, the water will come from three wells that have already been put in on the north side of town. Neidel expects the project to be finished and in operation within 18 to 24 months. The project will be funded through combined waterworks and sewage system revenue bonds.
Yuvonna Stapelton, city clerk, said although the city is asking for $6 million, the project will total only about $4 million. The rest of the money, she said, will be saved and used as needed to pay for usage costs and maintenance.
If the project passes, the city says it intends to keep water line costs consistent by controlling supply costs. The money currently being spent to purchase water from Independence would be used to finance improvements of the new water treatment facility.
If the issue does not pass however, the city says it will continue to purchase its water from outside cities and other suppliers and any increases will then be passed on to the consumers.