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Examiner
  • Diane Mack: No matter their age, sick kids need Mom

  • I had an unusual experience this past Sunday. It was the day of the Super Bowl.



    The story begins, at church, when my cell phone vibrated. A vibrating cell phone always means, a crisis, and it was.



    The text message read, “Call home, Kelsey’s sick.”

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  • I had an unusual experience this past Sunday. It was the day of the Super Bowl.
    The story begins, at church, when my cell phone vibrated. A vibrating cell phone always means, a crisis, and it was.
    The text message read, “Call home, Kelsey’s sick.”
    It wasn’t a fever, or nausea, but a run to the bathroom, just as quick as-you-can-kind-of-sick.
    As a result, I jumped in the car and raced home.
    Kelsey was sleeping. I sent her helper home. Then, I turned on the computer.
    I knew I’d be home all day, so I could surf for our summer beach house.
    As soon as I started to search something nudged me to check on Kelsey. When I entered her bedroom, I heard, “help me.” It was bad.
    Kelsey looked up, repeating several times that she was sorry. I told her not to worry, and “It happens to everyone, Kelsey.”
    I started the wash machine, when I heard the phone ring and a voice mail from one of the kids.
    “Mom, are you watching the Super Bowl?” was their message.
    I wanted to holler back, “No I am not, because I am happily headed to the bathroom super bowl.”
    How can anyone watch football, when someone else is sick?
    Anyway, we were walking into the bathroom when Kelsey says, “I need to hurry.”
    I re-directed Kelsey toward the tub and began to undress her.
    Kelsey normally uses a shower chair. However, this time, she wanted a bath.
    I ran the water, as I helped Kelsey lift one leg into the tub.
    Kelsey has cerebral palsy, which for her, means tight muscles. However, when she is sick, it is even harder for Kelsey to move.
    After a 20-minute process, Kelsey slid into the tub. She was happy and wanted to soak for a while.
    For that reason, I returned to the computer to search for beach houses. This is our East Coast family and beach summer.
    While Kelsey was soaking, I heard the phone ring and another message from the kids.
    “Mom, Baltimore is the one!”
    I thought, are you kidding me?
    I am not a Maryland beach fan. We were headed to Delaware, and either Rehoboth, Dewey, or Indian Beach.
    These kids, here I was working my head off, with a sick Kelsey, and they’re yelling in the phone about going to Baltimore.
    I ignored their calls and went back to work. Together, Kelsey and I cleaned every part of her body. Her hair, shoulders, back, and legs were soaped and scrubbed.
    Page 2 of 2 - From the tip of Kelsey’s toe nails to the top of her hair follicles, she was fresh as a daisy.
    However, the real work was about to begin. I had the task of lifting Kelsey out of the tub. Let’s talk weight lifting.
    I had to use every bit of my creativity and strength to maneuver her body out of the tub. I finally realized, it would be easier for me to get in the tub, brace her feet against the tub wall, hold her hips, and push from behind.
    While I am practically hanging from the shower nozzle, I hear the phone, again, and a message about a commercial and a sandcastle.
    How can these kids, think of sandcastle commercials, while I am mountaineering Kelsey out of the tub? I wanted to throw the phone.
    No matter, we each, had a good day, at our bowls. The kids watched a power outage, farmer, Clydesdale, goat, and a California Maryland war while . . .
    I spent the day with an angel.
    Diane Mack is coordinator of Putting Families First, Jackson County’s Family Week Foundation. Email her at jacksoncountyfamilyweek@yahoo.com or visit www.jacksoncountyfamilyweek.org.
     
     
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