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Examiner
  • T.A.K.E. classes Sunday at events center

  • The Ali Kemp Educational Foundation wants girls and women of all ages to redefine what it means to act like a lady.


    For the second year in a row, Junior Service League of Independence is bringing the T.A.K.E. Foundation self-defense training class to Eastern Jackson County. Here are five things to know before attending the event Sunday afternoon at the Independence Events Center.

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  • The Ali Kemp Educational Foundation wants girls and women of all ages to redefine what it means to act like a lady.
    For the second year in a row, Junior Service League of Independence is bringing the T.A.K.E. Foundation self-defense training class to Eastern Jackson County. Here are five things to know before attending the event Sunday afternoon at the Independence Events Center.
    1 WHY INDEPENDENCE?
    Each year, the Junior Service League’s first-year membership class organizes a project for full membership. In 2012, the provisional class organized a T.A.K.E. event at William Chrisman High School for its project.
    “It was great. It was really well-attended and well-organized, and I think everyone who participated found it to be really valuable,” said Eileen Weir, a Junior Service League member who also participated in last year’s class.
    This year, JSL wanted a bigger venue to bring back the self-defense class, so the organization paired up with the Events Center. The two-hour training will take place prior to Sunday afternoon’s Missouri Comets soccer game.
    2 WHO SHOULD ATTEND?
    Participants must be at least 12 years of age. Participants younger than age 18 must have a parent or guardian sign their waiver form. Even women in their 80s have attended past T.A.K.E. classes. Participants are encouraged to dress comfortably and to bring a friend or a relative with whom they feel comfortable participating in partner-formatted activities. The class is intended for girls and women only, according to T.A.K.E.’s website.
    3 WHAT TAKES PLACE?
    The two-hour class is divided into several sessions. In the first 30 minutes, instructors will speak about the importance of safety and how women can make themselves more aware of their surroundings.
    Next, the class teaches simple moves to make if participants find themselves in an unsafe situation. The last 30 minutes wraps up with real-life stories and time for questions and answers.
    “I would definitely do it again, just as a refresher,” Weir said. “I found it to be valuable. I think that women benefit from just being a little bit more aware of their surroundings and feel empowered if they know how to handle their surroundings if something doesn’t feel quite right.”
    4 WHAT IS THE COST?
    The class, from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., is available at no cost, although a donation of $20 is suggested. Tickets also will be available for the 3:10 p.m. Missouri Comets benefit game. The $15 ticket price provides $5 back to charities.
    Registration is required at www.independencejsl.org.
    5 WHO WAS ALI KEMP?
    Alexandra “Ali” Kemp was 19 years old in the summer of 2002. She had just finished her freshman year at Kansas State University in Manhattan, Kan., and was a member of Pi Beta Phi sorority. She was murdered while working at a swimming pool in Johnson County, Kan.
    Page 2 of 2 - Ali’s father, Roger, discovered his first-born child’s lifeless body, but he didn’t sit back in sorrow. He had four billboards placed across greater Kansas City, advertising a $50,000 reward and showing the police sketch of the suspect in Ali’s death.
    As a result, Benjamin Appleby was arrested in 2004. He is serving a 50-year sentence for first-degree murder.
    Roger also founded The Ali Kemp Educational Foundation, and self-defense classes like Sunday’s have taught tens of thousands of women how to fight for themselves. T.A.K.E. derives its name from the initials of the foundation name.
     
     

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