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Examiner
  • 50 Years Ago in The Examiner

  • News from Nov. 29 to Dec. 5, 1958.

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  • The following items were taken from the Nov. 29 through Dec. 5, 1958, Examiner.
    The board of directors of the Independence Chamber of Commerce elected C. Phil Davis, hotel executive, as president for 1959. Other officers are P.C. Livesay, manager of the Standard Oil Refinery at Sugar Creek, first vice president; Phil K. Weeks, president of Phil Weeks & Associates, second vice president; Howard Cook of Howard Cook & Co., third vice president; and Jay Weeks of Carmichael and Weeks, treasurer.
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    The Rev. John A. Fredrick, an assistant minister of Central Presbyterian Church in Kansas City the last eight years, will begin a pastorate at Calvary Presbyterian Church, 2911 Blue Ridge, on Dec. 7. Fredrick fills the pastorate left vacant by the Rev. Walter L. Brown, who with Mrs. Brown, have moved to Bull Shoals, Ark.
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    George Adamski, author of several books on flying saucers, will speak at a meeting of the Unidentified Flying Objects Study Club at Drexel Hall  in Kansas City. He wrote such books as “Flying Saucers Have Landed,” “Inside the Space Ships” and “Telepathy, the Cosmic or Universal Language.”
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    Fire that raged out of control for six hours destroyed 20 to 50 units and a restaurant at the Green Crest Motel, 15014 U.S. 40, just east of Noland Road, causing an estimated $200,000 damage to buildings and contents. Pumper trucks from Independence, Blue Springs and Raytown responded to the scene. No injuries were reported
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    Capt. Alan Villiers, who brought the Mayflower II from Plymouth, England, to Plymouth, Mass., in June 1957, completing an epoch-making Atlantic crossing, will be the speaker at the December meeting the Knife and Fork Club. Villiers has sailed around the world 30 times.
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    The Rev. William O. Poe, minister of Waldo Avenue Baptist Church, was elected president of the Independence Area Ministerial Alliance. The Rev. Poe succeeds the Rev. Donald McKay, minister of the First Christian Church.
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    A George Caleb Bingham painting of historical significance is serving as inspiration to Jackson County Historical Society members who are busy with restoration plans for the old Jackson County Jail as a county museum. The picture was painted inside the jail by Bingham just after the Civil War. The painting depicts the plight of a Baptist preacher, a former Union Army major, incarcerated in the cell at the old jail because of his refusal to take the loyalty oath to the government.
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    H.P. Anderson, manager of the J.C. Penney Co. store here since 1927, announced his retirement effective Dec. 31. He has been associated with the company for the last 37 years, having joined the firm as a trainee at the Pittsburg, Kan., store April 27, 1921. He came to the Penney store when it was located at 109 W. Lexington, where the Singer Sewing Machine store is now. The business expanded, and in 1930 moved to its present location at 113-115 W. Lexington.

    Page 2 of 2 - Jillayne Ritchie compiles the 50 Years Ago column.
     

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