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Examiner
  • Schwaller: Stay safe in the sun and avoid harmful rays

  • Baby, it’s hot outside! So, this week, I offer you the some real information on sunscreen. I am a believer in the phrase “knowledge is power.” The more you know, the easier it will be to make use of what will be important for you and your health. So, here is what I know about sunscreen.

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  • Baby, it’s hot outside! So, this week, I offer you the some real information on sunscreen. I am a believer in the phrase “knowledge is power.” The more you know, the easier it will be to make use of what will be important for you and your health. So, here is what I know about sunscreen.
    The American Academy of Dermatology recommends the use of a broad-spectrum (protects against UVA and UVB rays), water-resistant sunscreen with a Sun Protection Factor (SPF) of at least 30 to be used year-round. Great. Now what does that mean? Here you go.
    Sunlight consists of two types of harmful rays.
    Ultraviolet A (UVA) rays and ultraviolet B (UVB) rays. UVA rays can and will pass through window glass and penetrate deep into the thickest layer of the skin. They can cause suppression of the immune system, which interferes with the immune system’s ability to protect you against the development and spread of skin cancer. Exposure to these rays are known to lead to signs of aging skin such as wrinkling and age spots. Yikes!
    The UVB rays are the sun’s burning rays and are the primary cause of sunburn, even though they are blocked by window glass.
    Always try to remember that UVA rays will “A”ge you, and UVB rays will “B”urn you. Simply scary, I say. Here is more info from the big guys.
    • According to AMA, the excessive exposure to both forms of UV rays can lead to the development of skin cancer.
     
    • The United States Department of Health and Human Services has declared ultraviolet radiation from the sun and artificial sources, such as tanning beds and sun lamps, as a known carcinogen.
     
    • The Skin Cancer Foundation has always recommended using a sunscreen with an SPF 15 or higher as one important part of a complete sun protection regimen. Sunscreen alone is not enough, however, so keep in mind these other skin cancer prevention tips:
    Seek the shade, especially between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.
    Do not burn.
    Avoid tanning and UV tanning booths.
    Use a sunscreen with an SPF of 15 or higher every day.
    Apply 1 ounce (2 tablespoons) of sunscreen to your entire body 30 minutes before going outside. Reapply every two hours.
    Cover up with clothing, including a broad-brimmed hat and UV-blocking sunglasses.
    Keep newborns out of the sun. Sunscreen should be used on babies over the age of six months.
    Examine your skin head-to-toe every month, and see your physician every year for a professional skin exam.
    Now, don’t get me wrong. I love the sun, a little vitamin D makes me feel good, and a summer glow can be gorgeous, but I am not willing to become a leathery prune face because of it. So listen up all you, golden goddesses. Be careful, plan ahead, be prepared and have a beautiful day!
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