Water. Everything living thing needs water to survive. Water covers 70 percent of our earth and yet, less than 1 percent of that is fresh water for us to use in drinking, cleaning, transportation, heating and cooling, industry, and many other purposes.

Water. Everything living thing needs water to survive. Water covers 70 percent of our earth and yet, less than 1 percent of that is fresh water for us to use in drinking, cleaning, transportation, heating and cooling, industry, and many other purposes.

The convenience of bottled water has surely hit all of us as we run out the door and grab a bottle on our way to the gym, ball game, soccer practice, or just to run an errand. Many people buy bottled water for the convenience alone, while others think water out of these bottles with pictures of mountain streams, and cool rivers must surely be more pure than their tap water. Actually, the Environmental Protection Agency strictly regulates the codes and standards on our tap water, while the U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulates bottled water. Many times bottled water distributers actually fill the bottles with their tap water, which is perfectly legal.

Water is different and therefore, some of the bottled water out there has captured these differences. If you’re going to buy it, you might want to know why the prices vary. If your bottled water does not have any of these distinctions, most likely it is tap water from the distributing company.  

Artesian Water: comes from a well, tapping an aquifer in which the water level stands at some height above the top of the aquifer. In other words, the tap is skimming the purest water off of the top of an aquifer (like an underground river) which then goes into the well and goes through a purification process. (Most of the City of Independence Water is this type, and is very high quality water; in fact it is some of the highest quality tap water in the country.)

Mineral Water: Comes from a source tapped at one or more bore holes or springs, originating from a geologically and physically protected underground water source. Mineral water is distinguished from other types of water by its constant level and relative proportions of minerals and trace elements from the source. No minerals may be added to this water.

Purified Water: Has been produced by distillation, deionization, reverse osmosis, or other suitable processes that meet the definition of “purified water” in the United States Pharmacopeia, 23rd Revision, January 1, 1995. (Sounds technical enough to be the distilled water for old irons!)

Sparkling Water: After water treatment, carbon dioxide may or may not be replaced to contain the same amount of CO2 as when it was taken from the source.

Spring Water: Derived from an underground formation from which water flows naturally to the surface of the earth.

Why am I giving you so much information on bottled water? Because it is estimated that Americans buy almost 30 billion water bottles a year and 80 percent of those end up in a landfill… every year. Almost 30 billion bottles a year looks like this: 29,800,000,000. Pretty sick, huh.

So, unless you are purchasing one of these expensive specialty waters mentioned above for a special occasion, you’d be just as well off to purchase a few refillable sport bottles, fill them from your tap and stick them in your fridge. They’ll be just as convenient, safe, and healthy as the store bought, pre-filled type, and they’re guilt free!



Take the Challenge!

If you buy bottled water and stop for one week, you can reduce your CO2 emissions by 3 pounds! Find out more at:



 Get off the Bottle Challenge:

http://www.carbonrally.com/challenges/4