|
|
Examiner
  • Jerry Plantz: What sings deeply in your soul?

  • April is National Poetry Month, so declared by the Academy of American Poets since 1996.



    Poetry has various forms from rhyme to free verse and, at this moment, countless poets throughout the world are writing for personal gratification or attempting a grasp at literary and financial immortally through publication.

    • email print
  • April is National Poetry Month, so declared by the Academy of American Poets since 1996.
    Poetry has various forms from rhyme to free verse and, at this moment, countless poets throughout the world are writing for personal gratification or attempting a grasp at literary and financial immortally through publication.
    The latter will rarely happen for, except for a finite few in this country, publishers would rather have a plague, than publish poetry. It doesn’t make money. There is no commercial market for it.
    While I am an author who has written poetry I have had a modicum of success with my poetry including the most published and requested poem of 2011, “I Held The Flag Today,” my cup runneth over not with shekels, or dollars.
    Still, hope springs eternal, (a saying created by poet Alexander Pope) for personal or monetary success.
    Eve Brackenbury is one of the most prolific writers and poets I know. I met Eve at one of my speaking events, and she invited me to a book signing at her Prospero’s Parkside Book store in Blue Springs.
    She has some insight as to why poets can’t make a living at their craft.
    “I have a rather brutal saying I use in workshops: ‘There is nothing wrong with writing poetry for yourself. But if you do, keep it to yourself.’ We can blame poetry’s lack of success as a viable career option all we want on publishers and agents. But the truth is, until poetry becomes a serious craft created for the audience, rather than the artist, poetry will remain a pitiable profession.”
    She adds, “The most important lesson I’ve learned as a poet is that my poetry is not about me.”
    While speaking at forums and workshops I have found my peers reading head-scratching poems that would require a college professor to decipher except that most of these poems are coming from college professors.
    Eve will agree: Are you communicating or obfuscating?
    A verse from one her latest poem, “She’ll Get Her Kiss,” about a soldier in combat, is visually graphic:
    His blurred gaze turns to hellish things;
    he is entrenched with death.
    April also salutes Mississippi poet Natasha Tretewey as poet laureate of the United States.
    My favorite bard is Alfred Lord Tenneyson. Celebrate this month by reading a poem. Better yet, write one.
    I give you President John Adam’s toast: Independence forever.
    Jerry Plantz lives in Lee’s Summit. His website is at www.Jerryplantz.com. Reach him at jerryplantz@msn.com.
     
     

        calendar