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Examiner
  • Missouri fights health care reform

  • Missouri became “ground zero” this year in a nationwide effort to fight “Obama Care” when voters overwhelmingly rejected a provision in the new federal health care law, according to Missouri Lt. Gov. Peter Kinder.

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  • Missouri became “ground zero” this year in a nationwide effort to fight “Obama Care” when voters overwhelmingly rejected a provision in the new federal health care law, according to Missouri Lt. Gov. Peter Kinder.
    The Republican spoke Wednesday at John Knox Village Sun Valley Clubhouse in Lee’s Summit. The audience was mostly senior citizens.
    Kinder has battled the federal health care law for months, calling it a “misbegotten federal health-controlled law.”
    Kinder supported a move in the General Assembly to put on the ballot a referendum, Proposition C, asking voters if Missourians should be able opt out of a provision requiring everyone to buy health insurance.
    Kinder trumpeted the measure, saying voters in all but one county passed it.
    “What we saw in Missouri was an F-5 tornado touch down and move across all 114 counties, leaving very little left of the federal health care law,” Kinder said. “It was passed by such an overwhelming margin in every part of the state, with tens of thousands of Democrats voting for it.”
    He said 71.4 percent of Missourians said voters “don’t want no part of it,” Kinder said.
    In addition to Proposition C, Kinder, of Cape Girardeau, sued in federal court in July to stop the federal health care law. Kinder named himself and three other people as plaintiffs.
    One plaintiff, a 75-year-old woman who had suffered from multiple health scares, was on Medicare Advantage, a specialized program for seniors. But according to Kinder, the new law will eliminate Medicare Advantage and enroll her in Medicaid.
    Kinder’s lawsuit is not spending taxpayer money. He is funding the suit through donations.
    His suit likely won’t overturn the health care law, according to legal experts. It could reach the U.S. Supreme Court, but not until 2013, when major components of the law will have already kicked in.
    Twenty states have filed lawsuits against the implementation of the federal health care bill.
    “There are limits to federal power, and we need to stand up to them on this,” Kinder said.
    Jeanie Lauer, a Blue Springs Republican running for state representative in District 54, said people are concerned about what is happening in her area. Health care is one of those concerns.
    A woman told Lauer she has to make a decision each month on whether to make the house payment or prescription drugs. “We shouldn’t have to have those situations going,” she said.
     
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