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Examiner
  • Roadside memorial rules proposed

  • Friends and families who want to post roadside memorials in Independence can do so, but it will cost them a fee, and they have to follow the rules, under a proposal being considered.



    The City Council heard a presentation Monday on the city’s Roadside Memorial Program.

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  • Friends and families who want to post roadside memorials in Independence can do so, but it will cost them a fee, and they have to follow the rules, under a proposal being considered.
    The City Council heard a presentation Monday on the city’s Roadside Memorial Program.
    Council Member Chris Whiting outlined the proposed guidelines from the Beautification Commission, which are based on existing ordinances and procedures.
    Memorial markers can be approved for any Independence resident who died from a vehicular accident on a city street. Markers would be on brown, 24-by-8-inch signs and cost $150 for the applicant(s). In addition to the deceased’s name, they could also include the fatality’s date and a safety phrase. Signs would remain in place for two years, with the city responsible for two free replacements during that period.
    Council Member Curt Dougherty said the intention of standardizing memorials is to keep them from being a distraction to curious drivers passing by.
    “I’m sure families don’t want to cause any more problems than we’ve had there,” he said. “This eliminates that problem while being sensitive to families.”
    During Monday’s study session, council also heard:
    -- A presentation from the Independence Japanese Sister City Committee about the upcoming 35th anniversary of the Independence-Higashimurayama relationship. Events are scheduled May 10-13.
    -- Reports from Public Safety, Storm Water and Parks sales tax oversight committees.
    -- A report from Power and Light Director Leon Daggett on potential future options for the Missouri City Power Plant on Missouri 210.
    Daggett said continued coal-fired operation could require $48 million to maintain environmental compliance through the next seven years, making it an undesirable option economically. The department is evaluating the possibilities of switching the Missouri City plant to biomass fuel, or retiring the plant after 2015 and beginning the preliminary process of a new gas-fired plant.

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