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Examiner
  • Tim Crone: Armstrong, Te'o provide plethora of material

  • It can be difficult at times to find something interesting in the sports world to discuss. However, with guys on the scene like Lance Armstrong and Manti Te’o, it’s difficult to avoid a discussion.

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  • It can be difficult at times to find something interesting in the sports world to discuss. However, with guys on the scene like Lance Armstrong and Manti Te’o, it’s difficult to avoid a discussion.
    Lance Armstrong is the individual athlete of all time who defines “entitlement.” He obviously believed he was above it all and no one and no thing would get in his way. He used his power in the sport of cycling to lie his way into dominance.
    The role of athletes is to provide a stage to learn and develop life lessons. Unfortunately, what we have learned first and foremost from Lance Armstrong is to keep our sports heroes measured on solid ground and not on an artificial pedestal.
    He proved himself to be a cold-blooded liar and cheat. He was able to get by with his transgressions by hiding behind cancer victims in his Livestrong Foundation. I was taken in by him – I have a workout room full of Livestrong equipment. Society set the stage for him to feel invincible. Power and money became the driving force and cycling provided his smoke screen.
    The Manti Te’o saga? What can I say?! His story makes you want to just shake your head. He is a young athlete who lives in a culture that communicates through space. I understand he is only 22 years old but surely an athlete of his stature, who plays football at the infamous Notre Dame, cannot be clueless.
    It will be interesting to see if the story plays out with him as a victim or as a willing participant – either way it makes no sense. The last six years of my career my biggest fear was of technology and its affect on young athletes. Texting, tweeting and Facebook have opened up a whole new avenue for young people to fall into traps. The lack of face-to-face contact in any relationship can set the stage for vulnerability.
    A Heisman Trophy finalist from one of the most famous football universities in the country should have enough common sense to avoid the situation that proved to be nothing more than ridden with shame and humiliation.
    I’m sure books will no doubt be written about these two guys, but the lesson to be learned is that caution should always be exercised by the athletes and fans should resist the temptation to believe all that they hear about their heroes. Athletes are mere mortals with all of the same faults and weaknesses as the rest of us. My final thought about both situations is, “C’mon man!”
    n Stan “The Man” Musial was one of the five greatest hitters in baseball history!
    n The Missouri Tigers basketball team got lit up at Florida. I may have to eat my words about how the Tigers can compete for the SEC Conference basketball championship.
    Page 2 of 2 - n The Royals now have six legitimate big league starters – Shields, Santana, Guthrie, David, Chen and Hochevar. I pinch myself everyday to make myself believe I am living in Kansas City.
    n Bill Self has developed a program that knows how to win. The Kansas Jayhawks are fun to watch down the stretch.
    n I am not sure Chip Kelly is an NFL coach. I would not be surprised to see him back at the college level in less than five years.
    n The Blue Springs girls basketball team taught the “big dogs” in Kansas a little lesson in how to play the game.
    n My quote this week is from American clergyman Roy L. Smith: “The man who cannot believe in himself cannot believe in anything else. The basis of all integrity and character is whatever faith we have in our own integrity.”
     
     
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